JulianBreamGuitar.com

Endnotes:

[1] Stuart W. Button, Julian Bream: The Foundations of a Musical Career, (Aldershot:Scholar Press, 1997), p. 16.
[2] Stuart W. Button, Julian Bream: The Foundations of a Musical Career, (Aldershot:Scholar Press, 1997), p. 16.
[3] England & Wales, Civil Registration Birth Index, 1837-1915; England & Wales, Civil Registration Death Index, 1916-2007.
[4] England & Wales, Civil Registration Birth Index, 1837-1915; England & Wales, Civil Registration Death Index, 1916-2007.
[5] Stuart W. Button, Julian Bream: The Foundations of a Musical Career, (Aldershot:Scholar Press, 1997), p. 17.
[6] Julian Bream, My Life in Music, directed and presented by Paul Balmer, produced by Judy Caine (Music of Earth, 2003).
[7] Stuart W. Button, Julian Bream: The Foundations of a Musical Career, (Aldershot:Scholar Press, 1997), p. 32.

[8] Stuart W. Button, Julian Bream: The Foundations of a Musical Career, (Aldershot:Scholar Press, 1997), p. 17; Julian Bream, My Life in Music, directed and presented by Paul Balmer, produced by Judy Caine (Music of Earth, 2003).
[9] England & Wales, Civil Registration Birth Index, 1916-2007; Stuart W. Button, Julian Bream: The Foundations of a Musical Career, (Aldershot:Scholar Press, 1997), p. 44.
[10] Stuart W. Button, Julian Bream: The Foundations of a Musical Career, (Aldershot:Scholar Press, 1997), p. 17. Julian Bream, My Life in Music, directed and presented by Paul Balmer, produced by Judy Caine (Music of Earth, 2003).
[11] Stuart W. Button, Julian Bream: The Foundations of a Musical Career, (Aldershot:Scholar Press, 1997), p. 17.
[12] Stuart W. Button, Julian Bream: The Foundations of a Musical Career, (Aldershot:Scholar Press, 1997), p. 17.
[13] Stuart W. Button, Julian Bream: The Foundations of a Musical Career, (Aldershot:Scholar Press, 1997), p. 17.

[14] Stuart W. Button, Julian Bream: The Foundations of a Musical Career, (Aldershot:Scholar Press, 1997), p. 17; Julian Bream, My Life in Music, directed and presented by Paul Balmer, produced by Judy Caine (Music of Earth, 2003); Graham Wade, The Art of Julian Bream (Ashley Mark Publishing Co., 2008), p. 13.
[15] Julian Bream, My Life in Music, directed and presented by Paul Balmer, produced by Judy Caine (Music of Earth, 2003).
[16] Julian Bream, My Life in Music, directed and presented by Paul Balmer, produced by Judy Caine (Music of Earth, 2003).
[17] Stuart W. Button, Julian Bream: The Foundations of a Musical Career, (Aldershot:Scholar Press, 1997), p. 17; Julian Bream, My Life in Music, directed and presented by Paul Balmer, produced by Judy Caine (Music of Earth, 2003).
[18] Stuart W. Button, Julian Bream: The Foundations of a Musical Career, (Aldershot:Scholar Press, 1997), p. 17; Julian Bream, My Life in Music, directed and presented by Paul Balmer, produced by Judy Caine (Music of Earth, 2003); Graham Wade, The Art of Julian Bream (Ashley Mark Publishing Co., 2008), p. 13.
[19] Stuart W. Button, Julian Bream: The Foundations of a Musical Career, (Aldershot:Scholar Press, 1997), p. 17; Julian Bream, My Life in Music, directed and presented by Paul Balmer, produced by Judy Caine (Music of Earth, 2003); Graham Wade, The Art of Julian Bream (Ashley Mark Publishing Co., 2008), p. 13.

[20] BMG March 1945, p. ____; Stuart W. Button, Julian Bream: The Foundations of a Musical Career, (Aldershot:Scholar Press, 1997), p. 17; Julian Bream, My Life in Music, directed and presented by Paul Balmer, produced by Judy Caine (Music of Earth, 2003); Graham Wade, The Art of Julian Bream (Ashley Mark Publishing Co., 2008), p. 13.
[21] Stuart W. Button, Julian Bream: The Foundations of a Musical Career, (Aldershot:Scholar Press, 1997), p. 17; Julian Bream, My Life in Music, directed and presented by Paul Balmer, produced by Judy Caine (Music of Earth, 2003); Graham Wade, The Art of Julian Bream (Ashley Mark Publishing Co., 2008), p. 13-14.
[22] Julian Bream, My Life in Music, directed and presented by Paul Balmer, produced by Judy Caine (Music of Earth, 2003)
[23] Stuart W. Button, Julian Bream: The Foundations of a Musical Career, (Aldershot:Scholar Press, 1997), p. 18; Graham Wade, The Art of Julian Bream (Ashley Mark Publishing Co., 2008), p. 13.
[24] BMG July 1945, p. 202; Graham Wade, The Art of Julian Bream (Ashley Mark Publishing Co., 2008), p. 14.
[25] Stuart W. Button, Julian Bream: The Foundations of a Musical Career, (Aldershot:Scholar Press, 1997), p. 29

[26] Stuart W. Button, Julian Bream: The Foundations of a Musical Career, (Aldershot:Scholar Press, 1997), p. 18; Julian Bream, My Life in Music, directed and presented by Paul Balmer, produced by Judy Caine (Music of Earth, 2003); Graham Wade, The Art of Julian Bream (Ashley Mark Publishing Co., 2008), p. 13.
[27] Stuart W. Button, Julian Bream: The Foundations of a Musical Career, (Aldershot:Scholar Press, 1997), p. 20, 27; Julian Bream, My Life in Music, directed and presented by Paul Balmer, produced by Judy Caine (Music of Earth, 2003); Graham Wade, The Art of Julian Bream (Ashley Mark Publishing Co., 2008), p. 13
[28] Stuart W. Button, Julian Bream: The Foundations of a Musical Career, (Aldershot:Scholar Press, 1997), p. 18.
[29] Stuart W. Button, Julian Bream: The Foundations of a Musical Career, (Aldershot:Scholar Press, 1997), p. 24.
[30] Stuart W. Button, Julian Bream: The Foundations of a Musical Career, (Aldershot:Scholar Press, 1997), p. 24.
[31] Stuart W. Button, Julian Bream: The Foundations of a Musical Career, (Aldershot:Scholar Press, 1997), p. 20-22.
[32] Stuart W. Button, Julian Bream: The Foundations of a Musical Career, (Aldershot:Scholar Press, 1997), p. 22.

[33] Stuart W. Button, Julian Bream: The Foundations of a Musical Career, (Aldershot:Scholar Press, 1997), p. 35.
[34] Stuart W. Button, Julian Bream: The Foundations of a Musical Career, (Aldershot:Scholar Press, 1997), p. 21.
[35] BMG, October 1945, p. ii and 14; Stuart W. Button, Julian Bream: The Foundations of a Musical Career, (Aldershot:Scholar Press, 1997), p. 83
[36] Stuart W. Button, Julian Bream: The Foundations of a Musical Career, (Aldershot:Scholar Press, 1997), p. 36.
[37] Stuart W. Button, Julian Bream: The Foundations of a Musical Career, (Aldershot:Scholar Press, 1997), p. 71.

[38] Stuart W. Button, Julian Bream: The Foundations of a Musical Career, (Aldershot:Scholar Press, 1997), p. 24-25; Julian Bream, My Life in Music, directed and presented by Paul Balmer, produced by Judy Caine (Music of Earth, 2003); Graham Wade, The Art of Julian Bream (Ashley Mark Publishing Co., 2008), p. 15.
[39] Stuart W. Button, Julian Bream: The Foundations of a Musical Career, (Aldershot:Scholar Press, 1997), p. 29.
[40] Stuart W. Button, Julian Bream: The Foundations of a Musical Career, (Aldershot:Scholar Press, 1997), p. 24.
[41] Stuart W. Button, Julian Bream: The Foundations of a Musical Career, (Aldershot:Scholar Press, 1997), p. 22.
[42] Stuart W. Button, Julian Bream: The Foundations of a Musical Career, (Aldershot:Scholar Press, 1997), p. 37.
[43] Stuart W. Button, Julian Bream: The Foundations of a Musical Career, (Aldershot:Scholar Press, 1997), p. 37.

[44] Stuart W. Button, Julian Bream: The Foundations of a Musical Career, (Aldershot:Scholar Press, 1997), p. 25-29, 44; Graham Wade, The Art of Julian Bream (Ashley Mark Publishing Co., 2008), p. 15.
[45] Stuart W. Button, Julian Bream: The Foundations of a Musical Career, (Aldershot:Scholar Press, 1997), p. 29.
[46] Stuart W. Button, Julian Bream: The Foundations of a Musical Career, (Aldershot:Scholar Press, 1997), p. 28-29.
[47] Stuart W. Button, Julian Bream: The Foundations of a Musical Career, (Aldershot:Scholar Press, 1997), p. 29; Graham Wade, The Art of Julian Bream (Ashley Mark Publishing Co., 2008), p. 15;
[48] Interview with Sean Raferty
[49] Stuart W. Button, Julian Bream: The Foundations of a Musical Career, (Aldershot:Scholar Press, 1997), p. 28.
[50] Stuart W. Button, Julian Bream: The Foundations of a Musical Career, (Aldershot:Scholar Press, 1997), p. 27; Graham Wade, The Art of Julian Bream (Ashley Mark Publishing Co., 2008), p. 15.
[51] BMG, The Spanish Guitar column, "A New Sonata" by Wilfred M. Appleby, August 1946 p. 203; Stuart W. Button, Julian Bream: The Foundations of a Musical Career, (Aldershot:Scholar Press, 1997), p. 42-43, 83; Graham Wade, The Art of Julian Bream (Ashley Mark Publishing Co., 2008), p. 15.

[52] PSG Bulletin Sept-Oct 1946; Graham Wade, The Art of Julian Bream (Ashley Mark Publishing Co., 2008), p. 16.
[53] England & Wales, Civil Registration Birth Index, 1916-2007; Stuart W. Button, Julian Bream: The Foundations of a Musical Career, (Aldershot:Scholar Press, 1997), p. 44.
[54] Stuart W. Button, Julian Bream: The Foundations of a Musical Career, (Aldershot:Scholar Press, 1997), p. 51, 124.
[55] Stuart W. Button, Julian Bream: The Foundations of a Musical Career, (Aldershot:Scholar Press, 1997), p. 22, 124
[56] Stuart W. Button, Julian Bream: The Foundations of a Musical Career, (Aldershot:Scholar Press, 1997), p. 37.
[57] Stuart W. Button, Julian Bream: The Foundations of a Musical Career, (Aldershot:Scholar Press, 1997), p. 52.

[58] BMG The Spanish Guitar column by Wilfred M. Appleby, December 1946 p. 47-48; Stuart W. Button, Julian Bream: The Foundations of a Musical Career, (Aldershot:Scholar Press, 1997), p. 30-31; Graham Wade, The Art of Julian Bream (Ashley Mark Publishing Co., 2008), p. 16.
[59] Stuart W. Button, Julian Bream: The Foundations of a Musical Career, (Aldershot:Scholar Press, 1997), p. 31.
[60] Stuart W. Button, Julian Bream: The Foundations of a Musical Career, (Aldershot:Scholar Press, 1997), p. 31.
[61] Stuart W. Button, Julian Bream: The Foundations of a Musical Career, (Aldershot:Scholar Press, 1997), p. 37-38.
[62] BMG, The Spanish Guitar column by Wilfred M. Appleby, December 1946 p. 47-48; Stuart W. Button, Julian Bream: The Foundations of a Musical Career, (Aldershot:Scholar Press, 1997), p. 30; Graham Wade, The Art of Julian Bream (Ashley Mark Publishing Co., 2008), p. 17.
[63] Stuart W. Button, Julian Bream: The Foundations of a Musical Career, (Aldershot:Scholar Press, 1997), p. 83-84, 124.
[64] Stuart W. Button, Julian Bream: The Foundations of a Musical Career, (Aldershot:Scholar Press, 1997), p. 124.

[65] Gloucestershire Echo 9 December 1946; BMG, The Spanish Guitar column by Wilfred M. Appleby, February 1947 p. 87; Stuart W. Button, Julian Bream: The Foundations of a Musical Career, (Aldershot:Scholar Press, 1997), p. 39; Graham Wade, The Art of Julian Bream (Ashley Mark Publishing Co., 2008), p. 16.
[66] Guitar Review 1947; Graham Wade, The Art of Julian Bream (Ashley Mark Publishing Co., 2008), p. 17.
[67] Stuart W. Button, Julian Bream: The Foundations of a Musical Career, (Aldershot:Scholar Press, 1997), p. 33.
[68]
[69] Stuart W. Button, Julian Bream: The Foundations of a Musical Career, (Aldershot:Scholar Press, 1997), p. 40.
[70] Stuart W. Button, Julian Bream: The Foundations of a Musical Career, (Aldershot:Scholar Press, 1997), p. 40-41; Graham Wade, The Art of Julian Bream (Ashley Mark Publishing Co., 2008), p. 17.
[71] Stuart W. Button, Julian Bream: The Foundations of a Musical Career, (Aldershot:Scholar Press, 1997), p. 56-57.
[72]


Julian Bream - Here begins his journey!

"Setting out on the voyage to Ithaca, you must pray that the way be long." C.P. Cavafy (1911) 


1933

Julian Alexander Bream

Born July 15, 1933, in Battersea, England.

Son of Henry George Bream (a commercial artist and amateur musician) and Violet Jessie Wright. [1]

Henry and Violet had married a little over a year earlier on June 12, 1932. [2]

Henry G. Bream (b. June 19, 1906 - d. November 9-10, 1950). [3]

Violet Jessie Wright (b. June 6, 1912 - d. March 1972). [4]


1935

Early in the year, 18 months after the birth of Julian, the Bream family moved to 25, Cleveland Avenue, Hampton, London, England. [5]


Young Julian's earliest musical memory: he remembers being fascinated by the sound of the grand piano his father had just bought for their new home. [6]


1936

The birth of Julian's sister, Janice Bream. [7]

1941
Julian and his sister Janice are evacuated to a farm out in the country on the west side of England (Shropshire) due to WWII. Julian first remembers the guitar when his father came to visit with a guitar and would accompany the farmer's wife while she played the organ and sang hymns. [8]


1942
Both Julian and his sister Janice arrived back home to Hampton from being evacuated the first time due to WWII.

1943

The birth of Julian's first brother, Anthony J. Bream. [9] (Anthony Bream became an accomplished professional painter and is known professionally as Antony Bream).


Julian started to have piano lessons with a local professor. Like most children, Julian liked playing but not practising. [10]


All Bream children evacuated for the second time to a farm out in the countryside of England (Cornwall), again due to WWII. They return home in 1944. [11]


1944

Julian attended Rectory Secondary Modern School. It is at school that he first "displayed" an interest in music, particularly with the plectrum guitar. [12]


Julian's father had a dance band and seeing guitars in the home increased his interest in them. Shortly after this period, Julian would play around with the guitars while his father was not home. [13]


Julian's father eventually caught him playing one of his guitars. Instead of chastising him, he asked Julian if he wanted to learn how to play. So here started Julian's first guitar lesson. His father taught him the jazz guitar. [14]

After a few months of playing the guitar, Julian was already starting to "sit-in" on his father's dance band. [15]

Julian's father starts a juvenile band so Julian could play with 5 other children; Julian is still studying the piano.

Henry started to show an interest in the Spanish classical guitar and its music after having read Wilfred Appleby’s articles on the instrument. Julian's father’s interest in the classical guitar did not go unnoticed by his son and soon he too became interested in the music. [17]



July 15

Julian's 11th birthday - his dad buys him an old finger-style Spanish classical guitar made by Salvador Ibáñez. Julian's dad's interest also starts shifting toward Spanish classical guitar music and starts losing interest in his dance band. They both learned through tutorial books. [18]

 
1945

Julian's father encourages a career in music but with an orchestral instrument (the guitar was not considered an orchestral instrument or even widely accepted as a solo classical instrument at this time). Julian continues to play the piano. [19]


March
Henry and Julian read a notice on the March edition of BMG. London Philharmonic Society for Guitarist (PSG) will be resuming its activities after being temporarily inactive during the war. The first meeting will be on April 21. [20]
 
April 21
The London Philharmonic Society for Guitarist (PSG) resumes its meeting after the war and Julian and his father start attending the meetings. Julian is asked to play the first time he attends and his first public performance at the meeting was very well received among the members. Julian played the "Study in B minor" by Fernando Sor. The president of the society, Dr Boris Perott, offers to start teaching him. [21]


Henry brings home a 78rpm recording of classical guitarist Andrés Segovia. Young Julian hears Segovia for the first time playing a Francisco Tárrega composition - the tremolo study "Recuerdos de la Alhambra". [22]


June 23

Julian plays at the following PSG meeting. He performs "Salut d' Amour" by Elgar, arranged by Obregon, "Danse Nord" by Giuliani and "Andante" by Diabelli. Henry volunteers to be the Librarian for the PSG. [23]


July

Julian's picture is published for the first time within the pages of a magazine dedicated to fretted instruments - the B.M.G. (Banjo Mandolin Guitar) magazine. A small paragraph mentions his acclaimed technical accomplishments at the age of 11. It states that he also plays the plectrum and Hawaiian guitar. [24]
 

July 16

Henry writes to the BBC requesting an audition for his son Julian but does not hear back from them until June 1946. [25]


July 21

Henry is officially appointed the librarian for the PSG. This ensures that Julian will have the greatest availability to tutorial texts and scores. [26]


Summer 1945
Julian wins a Junior Exhibition Award for playing the piano awarded by the London County Council. He is granted free tuition to learn piano at London's Royal College of Music on Saturday mornings. He was 12 years old. [27]


August 17

Henry writes Wilfrid Appleby for the first time. As the librarian for the PSG, he submitted monthly reports to Appleby (editor to the PSG's Bulletin). [28]


August 18

At the PSG meeting, Julian plays duets with his father by Scarlatti and Carulli. Julian then played a solo by César Frank, a waltz by Carcasi and a study by Carulli. [29]


September 15

Julian plays at the PSG meeting and performs "Légende" by Shand, "Andantino" by Carcasi and "Prélude et Impromptu" by Shand. [30]


September

Julian begins his four hour-long Saturday sessions at the Royal College of Music. Tuition granted to him for winning the competition for playing the piano earlier that year. [31]


After 2 sessions at the Royal College of Music, Julian decides to bring his guitar to the college on Saturday and show everybody, including his music appreciation tutor Professor Roberts, that it is indeed an instrument worthy of classical music. Julian continues to perform informal recitals at the college on Saturdays. [32]


Mr Appleby makes his first suggestion that Henry should consider allowing Julian to perform at a "trial" recital. A controlled event that should end up as a positive experience for Julian. [33]


October (early in the month)

Henry takes Julian to meet Victor Olaf of Decca. Mr Olaf is greatly impressed by Julian's guitar playing and insists that he concentrate solely on classical music. Additionally, he states that while Julian is likely ready to record, it would probably be best to wait a year. [34]


Terry Usher composes "Suite for the Spanish Guitar" upon Henry Bream's request. This suite would be the first piece written for Julian. [35] (Julian had already well passed this level of composition and was already performing pieces significantly more difficult. It does not appear that he ever performed this suite in any of his recitals as a youth).


October 15

After Mr Appleby's insistence that Julian should play a recital, Henry develops a program for Julian's first "trial" recital at Cheltenham Public Library, Art Gallery and Museum. The recital was to take place in January 1946. Due to Dr Perott's opposition and insistence that Julian was not ready, the plans for the recital were cancelled. Dr Perott at this time promised that the PSG would arrange a recital for Julian next October (1946). This plan for a recital never materialized. [36]

November

Dr Perott informs Julian and his father that Andrés Segovia will be playing his first post-war concert in England. He wants to arrange for Julian to meet and play for Segovia. The date is tentatively set for December 1, 1945. Due to a lack of funds to pay Segovia his fee of 75 pounds, the concert was cancelled. [37]



1946
January 5

PSG holds its annual general meeting at Alliance Hall in Westminster. Wilfrid M. Appleby, a writer for the BMG, attends his first PSG meeting. Appleby had just started a regular column that month devoted to the Spanish Classical Guitar. Julian performed "Preludium" by Giuliani, "Rondoletto" by Darr and "Calme du Soir, Op. 58" by Shand. Appleby announces to the members that Julian is the "brightest hope for the classical guitar in England". Appleby privately admonished Henry for allowing Dr Perott to teach Julian his archaic pedagogical approach in addition to allowing him to suggest that Julian should consider playing the guitar with extra bass strings. [38]


February 16

Julian is invited to the British Federation of Banjoist, Mandolinist, and Guitarist at Alliance Hall. Julian performs "Study No. 5 in B minor" by Sor and "Légende, Op. 201" by Shand. Another extremely successful performance by Julian. [39]


March 30

Julian performs the "Grand Solo for Guitar" by Sor at the PSG meeting. His performance of the difficult piece was so mature that his father realizes for the first time that his son truly possesses a gift for the guitar. [40]


May

Henry inquires at the Royal College of Music for the possibility of Julian learning a second official instrument and suggested the cello. Academically, the classical guitar was something Julian was practising for pleasure and was not an official study. At this time, the piano was Julian's official instrument and the guitar was unofficial. [41]


May 8

Julian requested to have a recital at Cheltenham after it was obvious that Dr Perrot was not going to fulfil his promise and arrange a recital for October (1946). [42]


Around this time Henry starts deciding what would be the most appropriate name for Julian as a professional musician. Until now he had often been referred to as "Alex Julian" although his birth name was actually Julian Alexander. Mr Appleby agreed with Henry that a simple "Julian Bream" would be best, despite Dr Perott's insistence that they make up an exotic foreign name for the young musician. [43]


June

Henry terminates Julian's lessons with Dr Perott. Henry and Mr Appleby felt that while efforts in teaching Julian discipline towards his instrument was appreciated, he was teaching an outdated method compared to the teachings of the Spanish classical guitarist such as Tárrega, Llobet and Segovia. [44]


Julian receives an official invitation from the BBC to audition on July 4, 1946. [45]

June-July

Julian starts learning from the study material sent by Appleby - a Tárrega based method. [46]


July 4

Auditioned for BBC but later received a letter stating that despite Julian's likelihood of becoming a promising musician in the future, they did not feel he was ready at this time. At this time Julian had only enough time to prepare 4 pieces with his new technique. The four pieces were "Étude" by Napoléon Coste, "Chanson" by Shand, "Danza Espanola No. 5" by Granados and "Légende" by Heinrich Albert. [47]  Julian stated much later in an interview with Sean Rafferty that they did not hire him because he said "sorry" in the middle of playing when he made a mistake. [48]


July 16

Julian performs for the PSG with his new technique. Everybody, including Dr Perott, congratulates him on his advanced playing. [49]


August

Julian starts his guitar lessons with Desmond Dupré. His studies are based on Pascual Roch's Tutor material (Roch was a student of Tárrega). [50]


Terry Usher composes "Sonata in A" upon Henry Bream's request. The sonata was written and dedicated to Julian Bream. Julian would keep the Usher sonata in his repertoire for almost 20 years. [51]


August 17

Julian performs for the PSG. "No. 5 Waltz" by Diaz, "Minuet" by N Coste.  When all the members had performed, a request was made for Julian to perform again. He then performed  "Study No. 23" by Sor and "Grand Vals" by Tárrega. Finally, he performed a duet with his father "Duet No. 2" by Darr. [52]


August 23

Paul Henry Bream is born. Julian's 3rd sibling. [53]  (WM note: The date stated in S.W. Button's book of August 26th is incorrect)


Henry buys Julian a René Lacôte 1824 guitar and a Maccaferri guitar (a guitar with additional base strings). [54]


September

Henry is notified that Julian will be allowed to study the cello at the Royal College of Music along with the piano. Julian initiates his study with the cello. [55]


October

At this time, Dr Perott had promised last October to set up a recital for Julian this October but the event was never arranged. [56]

October 19

Julian performs at the PSG meeting and plays the Maccaferri guitar in public for the first time. The use of a guitar with added base strings was upsetting to Appleby who supported only the traditional six-stringed classical instruments. [57]

October 20

The British Federation of BMG Junior Trophy rally is held at Central Hall in Westminster. Julian does not compete but performs as a "special" item at the end. He performs "Rondoletto" by Darr. The audience was so taken by the performance they applauded for numerous encores.  Julian played a study and prelude by Carcassi. While the audience applauded for more, Julian bowed and left the stage after the second encore. Julian signs autographs for the first time. There may not have been a "trophy" involved for Julian but the event represented a high honour for the performer. [58]


It is at this time that Henry realizes that if Julian is not performing for an award or school grade, then there needs to be a financial compensation involved for his performance. [59]


November

Julian was asked to play a very select after-dinner party, along with other entertainment, for the guest of Prince and Princess Galitzine in Knightsbridge. [60]


November

Henry developed a program for Julian to perform on November 30.  This is the second attempt to have his first "trial" recital at Cheltenham Public Library, Art Gallery and Museum. The initial attempt for the "trial" recital having been last January. The November 30 recital was delayed yet another week till December 7 so the recital could be held in the Chinese Porcelain Room at the Cheltenham Art Gallery. [61]


December

The December issue of BMG is published with a summary and stunning review by Wilfred Appleby. The article focuses on Julian’s performance at the British Federation of BMG Junior Trophy rally. Towards the end of the article, a plea is made toward the readership to help in the quest to provide the young Julian with a first-rate modern concert guitar.  [62]


Julian and Henry meet Reginald Smith Brindle at the PSG meeting. He agrees to compose something for Julian to play. [63]


December 5

Julian plays a short recital for the Annual Social of the Brompton Ward Conservative Association in Kensington. [64]


December 7

Julian finally plays his "trial" recital at Cheltenham Public Library, Art Gallery and Museum in the Chinese Porcelaine Room. He plays with an adult-sized Salvador Ibáñez classical guitar owned by W. Appleby. The event is essentially a private concert. [65]  A few months later in 1947, this trial concert is reviewed by the prestigious New York magazine, Guitar Review. This is the first time that Julian Bream is mentioned in an American publication. [66]


December 17

Julian plays the cello for the London County Council Junior Exhibitioners (public concert). [67]


Julian decides to develop his guitar technique on his own, through trial and error. [68]

The BBC offers Julian the opportunity to perform on the radio show Children’s Hour for Young Artist in January 1947. Julian was recommended by Gwenn Knight, a guitarist and member of PSG that had also appeared on the show. [69]


1947
January 7

Julian plays his first radio show for the BBC called the Children's Hour for Young Artist. He played Turina's "Fandanguillo", Carcassi's "Prelude" and Schumann's "Romanza". He was paid one guinea and was sent a congratulatory mail-bag which confirmed the popularity of his appearance on the show. [70]  He played the Maccaferri guitar (additional unfretted string guitar) which gave Appleby displeasure when he tuned in to hear the broadcast. [71]


January 18

Julian performs for the PSG meeting and plays Granados' "Tondilla" and Bellini's "I Capuletti ed I Montecchi". [72]


Henry declines an offer for Julian to play for free at the Turland Hill's Federation Rally for Banjoist, Mandolinist and Guitarist. [73]

February 17

Julian's first formal public recital held at the Cheltenham Art Gallery was a success. He was 13 years old. Julian plays his smaller sized Salvador Ibáñez classical guitar given to him when he was 11 years old. This recital is considered his official debut and the beginning of his professional career. [74]

Julian plays the cello for the London County Council Junior Exhibitioners (his second public concert as a cellist). [75]


May 5

Julian plays a recital at the Colonial Hostel, Earl's Court, London. 70 people attend and Julian plays a very small used Panormo guitar. [76]
 
June

Julian is featured in the June issue of the BMG magazine. The issue included a summary of Julian's accomplishments along with a photo on the cover.


June 25

Henry exchanged the Maccaferri guitar for a Spanish-style classical guitar the Italian Giuseppe Calace of Naples.


Late July

The Breams finally meet Terry Usher. Usher lends Julian his Clifford Essex Hauser


August

Henry Bream finds a Ramirez guitar in very poor condition but he decides to buy it and restore it. It ends up sounding very good once repaired.

This becomes the first guitar that Julian strung up with Augustine nylon strings; strings that Henry had bought from Perott back in May and were very difficult to acquire and expensive to buy. Julian would only use these strings for performance.


August 30

Performs for a Broadcast - Spanish section for the BBC overseas service. A British artist performs Spanish compositions to the Spanish nation!

Plays "Study in D minor" by Sor, "El Testament d' Amelia" by Llobet, "Study in A" by Tárrega and "Cádiz" by Albéniz. Julian performs with the refurbished Ramirez guitar and gets paid 3 quids.


One day in the summer of 1947, Henry buys a "lute" guitar from a sailor for 2 quids.


September
Wilfred Appleby, Terry Usher, A. P. Sharpe and Henry Bream meet to discuss the formation of a trust for Julian to advance his musical career with the classical guitar. They also considered having Julian taught by celebrated guitarist Luise Walker. This meeting was in response to the lack of commitment from Dr. Perrot and the PSG to aid Julian financially.


October

The tentative date for a début recital at the Wigmore Hall in October. The event was supposed to be arranged by Dr Perott and once again he fails to come through with the recital arrangements. 


October 14

Second broadcast for Spanish section for the BBC overseas service.

Performs in an ensemble of 4 guitars, 2 flutes, and 2 violas. The ensemble pieces are for Eduardo Martínez Torner's La Cueva de Salamanca and La Cárcel de Sevilla. Then he performed two solos, "Chaconne" by Bach and "Marizapalos".


October 27

Julian performs for the British federation of Banjoist, Mandolinist and Guitarist at Kensington Town Hall. Julian plays a Bach "Prelude", "Serenata Española" by Malats, and Bellini/ arr. Mertz: "I Capuletti ed I Montecchi"


December 7

Andrés Segovia travels to London to broadcast on November 25th. On the 7th of December, he scheduled to play  Castelnuovo-Tedesco's Concerto in D. Op. 99 for guitar and orchestra with the New London Orchestra and Alec Sherman conducting. The concert takes place at the Cambridge Theater in London and Julian and his family are in attendance. Julian's father was able to get to tickets at the front row of the balcony. Julian brings his binoculars so he can concentrate on Segovia's left-hand technique.


December 8

Segovia attends a PSG reception at Alliance Hall with classical guitarist and singer Olga Coelho. Segovia invites Julian to play. After Julian's unscheduled performance is finished, Segovia acknowledges that the young guitarist has great promise.


December 18

Segovia invites Julian to his hotel and he is accompanied by his father and a PSG representative. Julian played for the maestro for over 2 hours.  Segovia then states that Julian not only has a great love for the guitar but a great ability to play it. He extends to Julian, with his father's consent, the possibility of teaching him full time if the funds could be raised to cover the cost of teaching and travel.


December
Henry formulated a programme for Julian to play at his second recital in Cheltenham on January 5. The program highlights 3 British composer’s as the centrepiece of the recital. Julian plays a George Panormo guitar from 1856. The Ramirez guitar Julian had been using had a full robust sound but it was not playing dependably beyond the 12th fret making Julian apprehensive to play the higher notes. The Panormo guitar was also a smaller scale length so easier for a 13 year-old boy to play. This is the first guitar known to be actually bought by Julian. He made the decision and paid for it himself.




1948



January 4
Julian is a guest artist with Arthur Cole’s Cheltenham Spa Palm Court Orchestra at the Town Hall. He was billed as the ‘Famous Boy Guitarist’. He played the “Serenata Española” by Malats, “Fandanguillo” by Turina and the “Fantasia” from Bellini’s opera I Capuletti ed I Montecchi. Cole publicly praised Julian’s playing and it ensured that the recital the next day would be well attended. Julian played with the Panormo guitar.

January 5
The second formal public recital at Cheltenham Art Gallery was a success. Julian plays a George Panormo guitar from 1856. The Ramirez guitar Julian had been using had a full, robust sound but it was not playing dependably beyond the 12th fret making Julian apprehensive to play the higher notes. The Panormo was also a smaller scale length so easier for a 14 year-old boy to play. This is the first guitar known to be bought by Julian, not his father Henry. He made the decision to buy it and paid for it himself.

Mrs J. Saunders-Davies introduced Julian at the recital and then afterwards had an informal gathering at her home. Julian played for an additional 2 hours at the informal gathering.

January 12
Julian played on a television programme called Music for You. He played the “Minuet” by Sor and “Serenata Espanola” by Malats. He was introduced on the programme with an endorsement by Andres Segovia. They stated that when Segovia heard Julian play a recently, he had commented that Julian would one day be a famous guitarist.

February
Segovia sends a letter to Dr Perott requesting that the PSG should financially support Julian classical guitar education.

March 3
PSG Annual General meeting. Perott has decided that it is time to discuss Julian’s future and establishing financial support in the form of a trust. Also, Julian’s London debut was discussed. Perrot had shown reluctance to have the PSG show definitive support for Julian until now. Not only did he not address the possibility of raising money to aid in Julian’s musical education with the guitar but he had also failed to schedule Julian’s London recital in the past despite promising to do so twice before.

March
Julian plays at the Social and Athletic Club of Gays (Hampton) Ltd. Premier Concerto pour Guitare et Quatour, op. 48. by Shand. Julian was accompanied by Reginald Evans on the piano. Julian used a prototype guitar constructed by the Abbott-Victor Music company. Initially, after construction, the guitar sounded better than any other guitar Julian had owned to that point.

April
Julian played as a ghost guitarist in the movie Saraband for Dead Lovers. Julian played while an actor in the movie was strumming the guitar. Julian played a Saraband based on Les Folies d’Espagne, op. 15 by Sor, He also played an obbligato part with the London Philharmonic Orchestra - score by Alan Rawsthorne. Again he played with the Abbott-Victor guitar.

After the rehearsal, Julian attended a party at Sir Michael Balcon’s house. Here he meets Barnett Freedman, a notable painter and lithographer.

May-June
The Julian Bream fund was announced in the bulletin for PSG and the BMG magazine.

June 10
Julian plays a radio broadcast concert at Hanworth Town Hall. He played Shand’s concerto. For this broadcast, Julian had to revert back to the Panormo guitar because the new Abbott-Victor guitar started losing its vibrancy and the wood started warping.

July 17
PSG arranged Julian’s first London debut at Alliance Hall. Henry would have preferred the prestigious Wigmore Hall. The stage at the Alliance hall was very low and Julian had to sit and play on top of a table that was just wide enough for his chair and footstool. Due to non-profit status, they were not permitted to sell tickets. A silver collection organized by Dr Perrot only raised a small amount of money.

July 19
The Times and the Daily Mail wrote a very favourable review of the Alliance Hall recital but criticized the small hall selected and the poor advertising.


Summer

Julia performed on a BBC radio programme aired on Thursday evening called Nocturne. The show featured fretted instruments and was broadcast over different countries.

August 8
Performed at a reception in honour of the Swedish Olympic team at Hampton Court Casino. The reception held by the Anglo Swedish Society.

August 9
Julian played on a television programme for a second time. The programme was called Teen-Age. Julian played ”Danza No. 5” by Granados.

August 24 and 28
Radio broadcast where Julian played “Los Mayos” from Piéces Caractéristicas by Moren Torroba and “Minuet” by Sor.

August
This is the month that Segovia was scheduled to be back in the UK and consider taking Julian on as a full-time student. Segovia does not make any contact with the Breams despite Henry writing him multiple letters that went unanswered.

September 26
Julian plays a recital at Witney Social Centre, Oxfordshire. This is the first time that Julian performs a recital that is mainly attended by non-guitarist. His prior recital had been attended mainly by people that were aficionados of the guitar.


October
Barnett Freedman, who had met Julian earlier in the year, decide to contact his acquaintance, Sir Dyson at the Royal College of Music on Julian’s behalf. Barnett informs Dyson that Julian is a young musical genius despite lacking significant musical education.


November

Segovia asks to meet with Henry, Julian and Miss Vollers for an interview. Segovia brings up a discussion questioning Julian’s need to be taught by him. Why should he consider teaching Julian when he had heard that Henry had been critical of Segovia and did not feel he had much to offer Julian as a teacher of the classical guitar. Henry assured him that he would never have made such a comment despite however accomplished he thought his son was at playing the guitar. By the end of the meeting all discrepancies on rumours heard were resolved and all seem to be well. Segovia mentioned at that time that Julian had great facility. Although Julian would benefit from the best musical training, he felt that Julian could likely manage without his instruction in that department. Segovia did offer to be available to advise Julian musically. Henry felt at this time that Segovia’s offer to take on Julian as a full-time student was no longer a possibility.


November 7
Perott held a meeting with PSG committee to discuss Julian’s future as a guitarist. They created an advisory body that included Vollers, Perott, Sharpe, Kingsley and Kennard.

November 17
Vollers and Kingsley meet with Sir George Dyson, Principal of the Royal College of Music, to discuss the possibility of Julian becoming a student at the college. Dyson recalls being informed about Julian several weeks prior by his friend Barnett Freedman. Dyson offers Julian the possibility of becoming a student at the college but with the purpose of studying composition and the piano as his first instrument. Julian is allowed to continue to play the guitar and can continue playing publicly. The school would not provide free tuition.

November 19
Leonard Priestley, an organist very impressed with Julian’s Witney recital, requested that Julian join him in an organ concert at St. Cuthbert’s Church, London.

November
Henry has been separated from his wife and now he has been granted custody of Julian and Janice but has lost custody of his two younger children.


November 27
Julian auditions for Sir Dyson. Dyson is impressed with Julian’s musical brilliance and accepts Julian without fee or exam. Henry had sold the piano so arrangements are made for Julian to move to Beckingham to live with Miss Voller in January. Miss Voller agrees to care for Julian. She has a large home with a Steinway grand piano that Julian can use.

December 12
PSG member David Caplan organizes Julian’s final recital for the year at the Linguist Club in London.



1949

January
Julian initiates his full-time studies at the Royal College of Music.

Julian mainly concentrates on his studies at the Royal College of Music from January 1949 to 1952. He played numerous engagements including college concerts and continued to perform at PSG meetings. Julian started playing duets at this time with Deric Kennard and started becoming involved with chamber music.

March 23
Julian plays a radio broadcast for the BBC radio.

May 5
Julian plays a radio broadcast for the BBC radio.

June 15, 16
Julian plays a radio broadcast for the BBC Third Programme. An English version of Lorca's Blood Wedding, the music written by Eduardo M. Tomer. Bream plays with Desmond Dupre. The show is recorded on June 15th and repeated on June 16th and July 7th.

June 27
Julian plays a radio broadcast for the BBC radio.

July 23
Julian plays a radio broadcast for the BBC radio.

December 20
Julian plays a radio broadcast for the BBC radio.


Late 1949

Due to some of the incidental music Julian was asked to play by the BBC, he starts becoming interested in sixteenth and seventeenth-century music. Here is how he developed an interest in the lute and it's music. Initially, he adapted the music for the guitar but he then started using an adapted German 6 string Guitar-Lute.



1950


January 31

Julian plays a radio broadcast for the BBC radio.

March 6
Julian plays a radio broadcast for the BBC radio.

March 9
Julian plays a radio broadcast for the BBC radio.

April 2
Julian plays a radio broadcast for the BBC radio.

May 7
Julian plays a radio broadcast for the BBC radio.

March 23
Julian plays a radio broadcast for the BBC radio.

August – September
The Phillip Brown’s Music Agency employs Julian to play guitar for an Arts Council production of Othello in Manchester getting paid 15 pounds per week.

It was at this time that Julian went to the Manchester Library and found a treasure trove of old music from the renaissance and baroque periods. He pulled out a book that was titled Thirteen Lute Solos by John Dowland arranged for piano by Peter Warlock. He played the piano music on his guitar and he was captivated by the beauty of the music. It was then that his interest and love for the music of that period began. 

August 31
Julian plays a recital broadcast for the BBC radio.

Julian meets Thomas Goff the harpsichord and clavichord maker. Goff offers to refashion the “guitar lute” bought by Henry years prior into an actual renaissance lute. The aristocratic Goff became Julian’s good friend and patron while he was trying to establish his career. Soon he would build him a lute that he would play for the next 12 years. The lute was based on a Tieffenbrucker lute in the Victoria and Albert Museum.

October 26
Julian plays a radio broadcast for the BBC radio.

November 3
Second London benefit recital sponsored by the PSG at Cowdray Hall in Cavendish Square. The recital was a huge success.
Dr. Perott invites several influential guests: Sir George Dyson (principal of the RCM), Harry Stubbs and Hubert Dawkes (Julian’s teachers at the RCM), Emmie Tillet (doyenne of music agents), Douglas Lawrence (BBC’s Light Music Supervisor) and Arthur Jacobs (music critic).

November 12
Julian plays a radio broadcast for the BBC radio.


While Julian is 18 years old, he starts teaching guitar technique and theory to the older Hector Quine. They became good friends and Julian, along with Thomas Goff, inspired and encourage him to try building guitars.



1951

January 10
BBC Arts Committee met to discuss Julian’s request to play a morning recital as opposed to short radio broadcast. This is something Henry had been trying to set up for Julian before his death.

March 16
Julian plays a morning recital for radio broadcast on the Home Service for BBC Arts.

April 21
Julian plays a broadcast for BBC Arts with the BBC Opera Orchestra conducted by Stanford Robinson. They perform Rodrigo’s "Concierto the Aranjuez".

Julian was offered 5 quid for his performance but he asked for more. The BBC finally agreed to pay him 7 guineas. This was Julian's first time playing with an orchestra.

April 23
E. Tillet arranges Julian to appear with a well-known singer, Winifred Radford, at the Mercury Theatre. Julian accompanied Radford while he sang Elizabethan ayres. The concert is financed by Thomas Goff.

April 24
The first broadcast of Rodrigo’s "Concierto the Aranjuez" recorded 3 days prior.


Shortly after the broadcast of the "Concierto the Aranjuez", Terry Usher sends Len and John Williams a recording of the last two movements of the concerto. They were both reportedly very impressed.


November 9
Henry Bream dies of cancer. At seventeen, without money or a steady job, he is forced to leave his father's home in Hampton, Middlesex.

November 26
Julian’s first Wigmore Hall recital. His Wigmore Hall concert début is considered a huge success. Arranged by Emmie Tillet and financed by Thomas Goff. Julian played the Martin guitar.



1952

June

Julian plays at the Aldeburgh Festival for the first time. Meets Benjamin Britten and Peter Pears at a party after the concert. While at the party, Pears asked Julian to play Elizabethan tunes so he can sing. Here the seed was planted that would lead to the beginning of Peter Pears and Julian's musical relationship.


John Williams meets Julian Bream at  PSG meeting


July

Julian enlist with the British Army to comply with his National Service. Initially based at Devices in the Pay Corps and then is transferred to the Royal Artillery at Woolwich. He is not allowed to bring his guitar and his lute so he leaves them in his car and places the car in long term storage.


Once at the Royal Artillery, he performed on the cello with the Artillery’s symphony orchestra and played electric guitar with the Artillery dance band. Julian is in the service from 1952 to 1955.


1953


Julian remains in service for the British Army. Julian plays classical guitar in clubs whenever he is on leave.


Julian Bream encouraged Stephen Dodgson to write for the guitar, resulting in his "Prelude, Nocturne and Toccata", Dodgson was disappointed when Bream strained his arm, delaying the first performance.



1954


Julian is approaching his last year of service for the British Army. Julian continues to play classical guitar for additional income whenever he is on leave.


The first recording session destined for release on a phonograph record. The recording sessions were for Westminster as a session lutenist accompanying the vocal ensemble Golden Age Singers. He is still in the service at this time.


Julian played a concert in Switzerland in 1954, followed by his first European tour.


September

Julian plays his fourth Wigmore Hall recital. Julian performed on a Quine guitar, the second guitar Hector Quine had ever built.


1955


Julian finishes his required time of service in the British Army. He is discharged from the service.


Julian records an album of Elizabethan lute songs with Peter Pears on Decca label- Elizabethan Lute Songs: vol. 1 of An Anthology of English Song. While this was not his first recording session destined to be released on a phonograph record, it was his first released phonograph record. It was also the first released recording where he was considered one of the main artist of the release receiving essentially equal billing with Peter Pears (an already established performer).


First recordings for Westminster as a primary artist, not a session musician.

Recording session for Spanish Guitar Music: Turina, de Falla, Sor and  Guitar Music of  Villa-Lobos and Tórroba. He used a Hector Quine guitar for these sessions.


1956

Release of both LP recordings Spanish Guitar Music: Turina, de Falla, Sor and  Guitar Music of  Villa-Lobos and Tórroba on the Westminster label.


Recording session for A Bach Recital for the Guitar and Julian Bream Plays Dowland


1957

Release ofboth LP recordings A Bach Recital for the Guitar and Julian Bream Plays Dowland. These would be his last recordings for the Westminster label.

1958

Made U.S. début


Recorded a second album of Elizabethan lute songs with Peter Pears, again on the Decca label- A Recital of Lute Songs. Although Bream would continue to record with Peter Pears in the future, this would be the last time that Julian Bream would record on the Decca label.


Julian Bream signs on with the RCA label


1959


September
Recording sessions for Guitar Concertos with the Merlos Ensemble, Conductor Malcolm Arnold at Decca Studios in London. These recordings would later be released on the RCA label. It would be his second LP release on that label.


October

Recorded his first sessions for RCA Victor at RCA Studio B in New York City, New York, USA- The Art of Julian Bream.


November
Additional recording sessions for The Art of Julian Bream at RCA Studio B in New York.


1960

Release of the LP recording A Recital of Lute Songs with Peter Pears on the Decca label.


Formed the Julian Bream Consort, one of the first groups to specialize in early ensemble music (1961).


September
Recording sessions for The Golden Age of English Lute Music at Decca Studios in London.


November
Release of the LP recording The Art of Julian Bream on the RCA Victor Red Seal label.


1961

January
Release of the LP recording Guitar Concertos on the RCA Victor Red Seal label.


September
Release of the LP recording The Golden Age of English Lute Music on the RCA Victor Red Seal label- Soria Series.


1962

June 21-23
Recording sessions for An Evening of Elizabethan Music with the Julian Bream Consort at Decca Studios in London.


November 27, 28
Recording sessions for Popular Classics for Spanish Guitar.

December 4, 17, 18, 27, 29
Additional recording sessions for Popular Classics for Spanish Guitar.


December (1962 or 1964)

Julian's second Bouchet guitar (built in 196_) was stolen from his car. Julian had stopped at the Queen's Elm Pub in Chelsea London for a quick pint and a smoke. When he returned to his car he found that the guitar was gone.

1963

Release of the LP recording An Evening of Elizabethan Music with The Julian Bream Consort on the RCA Victor Red Seal label- Soria Series.


April 4, 6
Live recording session for Julian Bream in Concert (featuring Peter Pears) – at the Westley Hall in Massachusetts and Town Hall in New York. All the selections on Side A were recorded live at Westley Hall except for selections 2 and 5 that were recorded live at Town Hall in New York. This was a Julian Bream solo tour of the US without Peter Pears. These recordings are found on Side A of the album that did not include Peter Pears.


September
Recording sessions for Music for Voice and Guitar with Peter Pears.


October 10
Live recording session for Julian Bream in Concert (featuring Peter Pears) – at the Wigmore Hall with Peter Pears. These recordings with Peter Pears only comprised Side B of the album.


October 22, 24-26
Recording sessions for Rodrigo, Vivaldi, Britten with the Melos Chamber Orchestra, Conductor Colin Davis and The Julian Bream Consort


1964


January
Release of the LP recording Popular Classics for Spanish Guitar on the RCA Victor Red Seal label.


March
Additional recording sessions for Music for Voice and Guitar with Peter Pears to re-record selection 13 "Fain would I change that note" from Anon in Love by William Walton.


May
Release of the LP recording Rodrigo, Vivaldi, Britten with the Melos Chamber Orchestra and The Julian Bream Consort on the RCA Victor Red Seal label.


May 12

Grammy Award for Best Chamber Music Performance at the Grammy Awards in 1964 for the year of 1963 was for An Evening of Elizabethan Music performed by the Julian Bream Consort. (6th Annual GRAMMY Awards).



Julian Bream was awarded Officer of the Order of the British Empire (OBE).


Julian Bream met his future wife, Margaret Williamson. They would not marry until October 1968.


1965


February
Release of the LP recording Music for Voice and Guitar with Peter Pears on the RCA Victor Red Seal.


March 9, 11, 12
Recording sessions for Baroque Guitar.


August
Release of the LP recording Julian Bream in Concert (featuring Peter Pears) on the RCA Victor Red Seal label.


September 21-23
Recording sessions for J.S. Bach: Suites, Nos. 1 and 2.


October 12-14
Additional recording sessions for J.S. Bach: Suites, Nos. 1 and 2.


Bream met Igor Stravinsky in Toronto, Canada in 1965. He tried unsuccessfully to persuade the composer to write a composition for the lute and actually played a pavane by Dowland for him. The meeting between Bream and Stravinsky, including Bream's impromptu playing, was filmed by the National Film Board of Canada in making a documentary about the composer.



1966

April
Release of the LP recording Baroque Guitar on the RCA Victor Red Seal label.


April 22-24, 28, 30
Recording session for Lute Music from the Royal Courts of Europe.

May 1, 17, 25
Additional recording session for Lute Music from the Royal Courts of Europe.


Summer

Julian Bream purchases Broad Oak, an 18th century Farm House in Simely, Wilshire.


August
Release of the LP recording J.S. Bach: Suites, Nos. 1 and 2 on the RCA Victor Red Seal.


September 16-18, 23-25
Recording sessions for 20th Century Guitar at the Wardour Chapel in Wiltshire.


Julian Bream made an Honorary Member of the Royal Academy of Music.




1967

January
Release of the LP recording Lute Music from the Royal Courts of Europe on the RCA Victor Red Seal label.


March 2
Grammy Award for Best Classical Performance – Instrumental Soloist or Soloists (with or without orchestra) at the Grammy Awards of 1967 for the year of 1966 - Baroque Guitar (Works of Bach, Sanz, Weiss, etc.). (9th Annual GRAMMY Awards).



Recording sessions for Dances of Dowland at the Wardour Chapel in Wiltshire. Exact session dates unknown.


August
Release of the LP recording 20th Century Guitar on the RCA Victor Red Seal label.


September 13-15
Recording session for Classic Guitar at the Wardour Chapel in Wiltshire.


November
Recording sessions for Julian Bream and His Friends at the Bishopsgate Institute.

December
Additional recording sessions for Julian Bream and His Friends at the Bishopsgate Institute.



1968

February

Release of the LP recording Dances of Dowland on the RCA Victor Red Seal label.


August
Release of the LP recording Julian Bream and His Friends on the RCA Victor Red Seal label.


September 15-17
Additional recording sessions for Classic Guitar at the Wardour Chapel in Wiltshire.


Honorary Doctorate from the University of Surrey


Edison Award



1969

January 2, 3
Recording sessions for Sonatas for Lute and Harpsichord with George Malcolm at the Bishopsgate Institute.

February

Release of the LP recording Classic Guitar on the RCA Victor Red Seal label.


April 8-9
Recording sessions for Elizabethan Lute Songs with Peter Pears at Conway Hall in London.


May

Nominated for Grammy award - Sonatas for Lute and Harpsichord with George Malcolm was nominated for a Grammy Award but did not win.


September
Release of the LP recording Sonatas for Lute and Harpsichord with George Malcolm on the RCA Victor Red Seal label.



1970


March
Release of the LP recording Elizabethan Lute Songs with Peter Pears on the RCA Victor Red Seal label.


May 15-17, 28-30
Recording session for Romantic Guitar at the Wardour Chapel in Wiltshire.

September
Release of the LP recording Romantic Guitar on the RCA Victor Red Seal label.



1971


February 1
Recording sessions for Julian Bream Plays Villa-Lobos at EMI Studios in London.

May
Additional recording sessions for Julian Bream Plays Villa-Lobos at the Wardour Chapel in Wiltshire.


July 12, 13, 31
Recording session for Julian & John (“Together”) at the Wardour Chapel in Wiltshire.

August 1
Additional recording session for Julian & John (“Together”) at the Wardour Chapel in Wiltshire.


September
Release of the LP recording Julian Bream Plays Villa-Lobos on the RCA Red Seal label.



1972


February
Release of the LP recording Julian & John (“Together”) on the RCA Red Seal label.


March 15

Grammy Award for Best Instrumental Soloist(s) Performance (with orchestra) at the Grammy Awards from 1972 for the year of 1971 - André Previn (conductor), Julian Bream & André Previn (conductor) with the London Symphony Orchestra for Villa-Lobos: "Concerto for Guitar and Orchestra" from the Julian Bream Plays Villa-Lobos album. (14th Annual GRAMMY Awards).


June 30
Recording sessions for The Woods So Wild at the Wardour Chapel in Wiltshire.

July 1, 2
Additional recording sessions for The Woods So Wild at the Wardour Chapel in Wiltshire.


September 30
Recording sessions for Julian Bream ‘70s at the EMI Studios in London.

November
Release of the LP recording The Woods So Wild on the RCA Red Seal label.


1973

Edison Award


February
Additional recording sessions for Julian Bream ‘70s at the Wardour Chapel in Wiltshire.


March 3
Grammy Award for Best Chamber Music Performance at the Grammy Awards from 1973 for the year of 1972 - Julian Bream & John Williams for
Julian and John (Works by Lawes, Carulli, Sor, Albéniz, Granados, de Falla and Ravel)(15th Annual GRAMMY Awards).


June
Recording sessions for Julian and John/2 (“Together Again”) with John Williams at the Wardour Chapel in Wiltshire.

September
Release of the LP recording Julian Bream ‘70s on the RCA Red Seal label.


1974


February 1-3
Recording sessions for Giuliani and Sor at the Wardour Chapel in Wiltshire.


April
Release of the LP recording Julian and John/2 (“Together Again”) with John Williams on the RCA Red Seal label.

March 22-24
Additional recording sessions for Giuliani and Sor at the Wardour Chapel in Wiltshire.

October
Release of the LP recording Giuliani and Sor on the RCA Red Seal label.


November 18
Recording session for Rodrigo and Berkeley with the Monteverdi Orchestra at the Walthamslow Town Hall in London.



1975

May 7
Additional recording session for Rodrigo and Berkeley with the Monteverdi Orchestra at the Rosslyn Hill Chapel in London.


June 3
Recording sessions for Concertos for Lute and Orchestra with the Monteverdi Orchestra at the Rosslyn Hill Chapel in London.

October
Release of the LP recording Concertos for Lute and Orchestra with the Monteverdi Orchestra on the RCA Red Seal label.


October
Release of the LP recording Rodrigo and Berkeley with the Monteverdi Orchestra on the RCA Red Seal



1976

The subject of a television biography, A Life in the Country, on BBC TV.


April 23-25, 28, 29
Recording session for Lute Music of John Dowland at the Wardour Chapel in Wiltshire.

September
Release of the LP recording Lute Music of John Dowland on the RCA Red Seal label.



The Villa-Lobos Gold Medal was personally presented to Julian Bream by the composer's widow.



1977


December

Recording of the BBC televised series Julian Bream Masterclass at his home, Broad Oak, in Semley.


1978

January

A series of master classes televised throughout the month of January called Julian Bream Masterclass. Four masterclasses in total on BBC TV.


May 26-28
Recording sessions for Villa-Lobos: 12 Etudes for Guitar and Suite Populaire Bresilienne at the Wardour Chapel in Wiltshire.

June 3, 4, 11
Additional recording sessions for Villa-Lobos: 12 Etudes for Guitar and Suite Populaire Bresilienne at the Wardour Chapel in Wiltshire.

October
Release of the LP recording Villa-Lobos: 12 Etudes for Guitar and Suite Populaire Bresilienne on the RCA Red Seal label.


October 15
Live recording session for Julian Bream and John Williams “LIVE” - a concert at Symphony Hall in Boston.

October 18
Live recording session for Julian Bream and John Williams “LIVE” - a concert at Avery Fisher Hall at Lincoln Center in New York.



1979

February
Release of the LP recording Julian Bream and John Williams “LIVE” on the RCA Red Seal label.


April/May
Recording sessions for Music of Spain, vol. 1 - Plays Milán & Narváez at the Wardour Chapel in Wiltshire.

September
Release of the LP recording Music of Spain, vol. 1 - Plays Milán & Narváez on the RCA Red Seal label.



RCA presented him with a platinum disc to mark record sales of 500,000 in the UK alone, as well as gold and silver discs for duo recordings with John Williams.



1980

Julian Bream decides to expand on his Music of Spain LP series to include a film on the history of the guitar in Spain. The preparation process for the series of films would take four years. During this time he continued to record and release LPs that would follow with the Music of Spain theme.


October 27
Recording sessions for Music of Spain, vol. 4 - The Classical Heritage: Sor and Aguado at the Wardour Chapel in Wiltshire.

November 1-4
Additional recording sessions for Music of Spain, vol. 4 - The Classical Heritage: Sor and Aguado at the Wardour Chapel in Wiltshire.



1981


May
Release of the LP recording Music of Spain, vol. 4 - The Classical Heritage: Sor and Aguado on the RCA Red Seal label.



Fellowship of the Royal College of Music


October

Recording sessions for Dedication at the Wardour Chapel in Wiltshire.


December
Additional recording sessions for Dedication at the Wardour Chapel in Wiltshire.



1982


January
Additional recording sessions for Dedication at the Wardour Chapel in Wiltshire.


June
Recording sessions for Music of Spain, vol. 5 - Plays Granados and Albéniz at the Wardour Chapel in Wiltshire.

July
Additional recording sessions for Music of Spain, vol. 5 - Plays Granados and Albéniz at the Wardour Chapel in Wiltshire.



Julian Bream authors a book along with Tony Palmer called A Life on the Road. The book deals with Julian Bream's life as a professional musician on the road.


October 2
Recording sessions for Music of Spain, vol. 8 – Joaquin Rodrigo at St. Johns Smith Square in London.


December
Additional recording session for Music of Spain, vol. 8 – Joaquin Rodrigo at the Wardour Chapel in Wiltshire.



1983


January
Additional recording session for Music of Spain, vol. 8 – Joaquin Rodrigo at the Wardour Chapel in Wiltshire.


February 19
Recording sessions for Music of Spain, vol. 7 - A Celebration of Andrés Segovia at the Wardour Chapel in Wiltshire.


March
Release of the LP recording Music of Spain, vol. 5 – Plays Granados and Albéniz on the RCA Red Seal label.


May 6

Additional recording session for Music of Spain, vol. 7 - A Celebration of Andrés Segovia at the Wardour Chapel in Wiltshire.


September 30
Recording sessions for ¡Guitarra! The Guitar in Spain at the Wardour Chapel in Wiltshire. Some of the outtakes for this recording session were to be used in other "Music of Spain" releases that never materialized. Some of those outtakes were used in a 1991 release titled La Guitarra Romantica: Llobet, Pujol, Tárrega.



Fellowship of the Royal Northern College of Music

1984


January
Release of the LP recording Music of Spain, vol. 8 – Joaquin Rodrigo on the RCA Red Seal label.


April 22

Additional recording sessions for ¡Guitarra! The Guitar in Spain at the Wardour Chapel in Wiltshire. Some of the outtakes for this recording session were to be used in other "Music of Spain" releases that never materialized. Some of those outtakes were used in a 1991 release titled La Guitarra Romantica: Llobet, Pujol, Tárrega.


June
Release of the LP recording Dedication on the RCA Red Seal label.


July

Bream is in a car accident. Loses control of his open-top MG car and hits a railway bridge,  significant soft tissue damage and a fractured right elbow. He attempted to drive home to phone for help but lost consciousness behind the wheel. The car eventually came to a halt halfway up a bank. A good samaritan found him and he was taken to a hospital in Salisbury. Bream has stated that the 2.5-hour surgery was performed under a local anesthetic so he spoke to the surgeon during surgical intervention. Bream felt that the surgery was a success and he still has permanent hardware in his arm from the orthopedic repair.


The accident happened after all the segments for the Guitarra film series were filmed except for the "Concierto de Aranjuez". This delayed the filming of the final segment and the release of the project for over a year.


Bream self-imposed a stringent rehabilitation program for his arm to get himself back to performance level and toured the US three months after the accident.


September
Release of the LP recording Music of Spain, vol. 7 - A Celebration of Andrés Segovia on the RCA Red Seal label.



Honorary Doctorate from the University of Leeds

1985

¡Guitarra! A Musical Journey Through Spain. An 8 part television series originally aired on Channel 4. The television series was made available on VHS.


March

Release of the LP recording ¡Guitarra! The Guitar in Spain on the RCA Red Seal label. This double LP was released as a companion to the 8 part television series ¡Guitarra! A Musical Journey Through Spain.


Julian Bream was awarded the medal of Commander of the Order of the British Empire (CBE)


1986


1987

July 7-9
Recording sessions for Guitar Concertos: Rodrigo and Brouwer with the RCA Victor Chamber Orchestra and Leo Brouwer at the Henry Wood Hall in London.


September
Recording sessions for Fantasies, Ayres and Dances with The Julian Bream Consort at the Wigmore Hall in London.

1988


February
Release of the CD recording Guitar Concertos: Rodrigo and Brouwer on the RCA Red Seal label.


April 22
Recording sessions for Two Loves with Peggy Ashcroft at the Wardour Chapel in Wiltshire.

September 20-22
Additional recording sessions for Two Loves with Peggy Ashcroft at the Wardour Chapel in Wiltshire.


October
Release of the CD recording Fantasies, Ayres and Dances with The Julian Bream Consort on the RCA Red Seal label.


Honorary Member of the Royal Philharmonic Society



1989

August
Release of the CD recording Two Loves with Peggy Ashcroft on the RCA Red Seal label.


October 1-2
Additional recording sessions for use in additional "Music of Spain" releases that never materialized. Some of those outtakes were used in a 1991 release titled La Guitarra Romantica: Llobet, Pujol, Tárrega. These recording sessions took place at the Wardour Chapel in Wiltshire.


1990


June
Recording session with the City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra and conductor Simon Rattle at Butterworth Hall Warwick University. Julian decided to record Joaquin Rodrigo's "Concierto de Aranjuez" for the fifth time! This recording would be used in a later release when Julian Bream had left RCA and had signed with EMI record label. This recording would eventually be released on a 1992 compact disc album titled To the Edge of Dream.


August 23-24
Additional recording sessions for use in additional "Music of Spain" releases that never materialized. Some of those outtakes were used in a 1991 release titled La Guitarra Romantica: Llobet, Pujol, Tárrega. These recording sessions took place at the Wardour Chapel in Wiltshire.

1991

BBC Prom performance of Malcolm Arnold’s Guitar Concerto, broadcast on BBC Radio and TV

June
Additional recording sessions for To the Edge of Dream with the City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra and Simon Rattle at EMI Abbey Road Studio No. 1 in London.


July
Release of the CD recording La Guitarra Romantica: Llobet, Pujol, Tárrega on the RCA Victor Red Seal label.


Autumn

Recital and concerto performances of works by Takemitsu at the Japan Festival in London with the London Symphony Orchestra.


1992

February
Additional recording session for To the Edge of Dream with the City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra and Simon Rattle at Butterworth Hall Warwick University.


September
Recording sessions for Nocturnal: Britten, Lutoslawski, Martin, Takemitsu and Brouwer at Forde Abbey in Dorset.

October
Additional recording sessions for Nocturnal: Britten, Lutoslawski, Martin, Takemitsu and Brouwer at Forde Abbey in Dorset.


October
Recording sessions for J.S. Bach at Forde Abbey in Dorset.

November
Additional recording sessions for J.S. Bach at Forde Abbey in Dorset.


Performed at the Wigmore Hall for their Gala Re-opening Festival.


1993

 During the 1992/3 season, he performed on two separate occasions at the Wigmore Hall – at their Gala Re-opening Festival, and at a special concert celebrating his 60th birthday. That year he toured the Far East, visiting Hong Kong, Taiwan, Korea and Japan, and performed the premiere of Leo Brouwer's arrangement for guitar and orchestra of Albéniz's Iberia at the Proms. 


Release of the compact disc recording To the Edge of Dream with the City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra and Simon Rattle on the EMI Classics label. This is Julian Bream's first release on EMI after having terminated his contract with RCA records.


Release of the compact disc recording Nocturnal: Britten, Lutoslawski, Martin, Takemitsu and Brouwer on the EMI Classics label.


November
Recording session for Sonata: Paganini, Castelnuovo-Tedesco, José at Forde Abbey in Dorset.


Release of the compact disc box set Julian Bream Edition - The Ultimate Guitar Collection. This box set was released in 1993 to coincide with the artist's 60th birthday.


1994

Release of the compact disc recording J.S. Bach on the EMI Classics label.


Bream made debuts in both Turkey and Israel. 


1995

Release of the compact disc recording Sonata: Paganini, Castelnuovo-Tedesco, José on the EMI Classics label.


Played for the soundtrack to the Hollywood film Don Juan de Marcos.

1996

Royal Philharmonic Society Instrumentalist's Award

1997

In celebration of the 50th anniversary of his debut, he performed a recital at Cheltenham Town Hall.


BBC dedicated a special television tribute This Is Your Life programme to Julian, filmed after a commemorative concert at Queen Elizabeth Hall, London.


1999

Doctor of Philosophy from London Guildhall University



2000

Tour of UK National Trust properties the summer and Autumn.



2001

Performed an anniversary recital at Wigmore Hall, celebrating 50 years since his 1951 debut there.


2003

Release of the DVD Julian Bream: My Life in Music. Gramaphone declared it the DVD of the year.


2005

Release of the compact disc recording Guitar Recital: Bach, Sor, Turina, Tippett, Schubert on the Testament label. These BBC studio recordings for radio were extracted from BBC archives for this collection. These actual recordings were never previously released on LP or CD. While some of these selections had been recorded and released on LPs prior and following these broadcasts, some of these selections are the only available recorded versions of these pieces by Julian Bream.

-J.S. Bach: Chaconne (1975).

-Fernando Sor: Introduction and Variations on Mozart's 'O cara armonia' Op.9 (1982).

-Joaquín Turina: Sonata Op. 61 - Allegro, Andante and Allegro Vivo (1956).

-Michael Tippett: The Blue Guitar - Transforming, Dreaming and Juggling (1984).

-Franz Schubert: Duo in A - Allegro Con Brio, Andantino, Menueto and Allegro (with John Williams, 1985)



Release of the compact disc box set Music of Spain. The box set is composed of all the recordings from the "Music of Spain" series that included various LPs including ¡Guitarra! The Guitar in Spain.


2006

September

Death of Paul Henry Bream at 60 years of age. Julian's youngest sibling.


2008

Julian Bream sells Broad Oak, his 18th century Farm House in Simely, Wilshire - his home for over 40 years.


2009

Julian Bream established his own charitable trust. The purpose of the trust is to commission major new works from leading composers in addition to providing scholarships for exceptionally gifted young guitarists and lutenists at the Royal Academy of Music, Royal College of Music and the Royal Welsh College of Music and Drama.


Honorary Doctorate from the Open University


2011

Release of the compact disc box set Julian Bream: My Favorite Albums. This collection included 10 of Julian Bream's favourite LP recordings from his RCA catalogue.


2013


Release of the compact disc box set Julian Bream - Classical Guitar Anthology. The Complete RCA Album Collection.


Received the Gramophone's Lifetime Achievement Award.


2020

August 14,

Julian Alexander Bream was found dead in his sleep in the early morning.

Here ends his long journey to Ithaca.


"Ithaca has given you your lovely journey.
Without Ithaca you would not have set out.
Ithaca has no more to give you now.

Poorer where you find it, Ithaca has not cheated you.
Wise as you have become, with all you experience,
you will have understood the meaning of an Ithaca."

                                                              C.P. Cavafy (1911) 



Sources for the chronological outline:

This is a list of sources used to compile this very extensive chronological outline.


- Julian Bream - The Foundations of a Musical Career by Stuart W. Button

- The Art of Julian Bream by Graham Wade.

- A Life on the Road by Tony Palmer and Julian Bream

- Classical Guitar Magazine - multiple issues

- Album liner notes on the back covers of his 50 plus LP releases

- Julian Bream: My Life in Music (film documentary, 2003)

- ¡Guitarra! A Musical Journey Through Spain (the 8 part television series for Channel 4, 1985)

- Julian Bream: A Full Life (television interview, 1982)

- Walton at 80 (television interview, 1982)

- Julian Bream: A Life in the Country (film documentary, 1976)

- Kenneth Allsop: A Conversation with Julian Bream (television interview, 1972)

- The Monitor: A Film Profile of Julian Bream (television interview, 1962)




Biography