​​​Dionisio Aguado:

Piesas para Guitarra, Tres Rondos Brillantes, Op. 2, No. 3  Introduction and Rondo - Andante; Allegro moderato. Music of Spain, vol. 4-The Classical Heritage: Sor and Aguado (1981)
Piesas para Guitarra, Tres Rondos Brillantes, Op. 2, No. 3 - Andante; Allegro moderato  (without the Introduction). ¡Guitarra! The Guitar in Spain (1985)


*While he recorded all 3 parts of the "Tres Rondos Brillantes" for the Music of Spain, vol. 4-The Classical Heritage: Sor and Aguado, he only re-recorded that last part for his retrospective album of Spanish music ¡Guitarra! The Guitar in Spain. That recording was also used in the film series ¡Guitarra! A Musical Journey Through Spain.¡Guitarra! 



Isaac Albéniz:

Cantos de España, Op. 232, No. 4: Córdoba (Nocturne)   (2 guitars). Julian & John " Together" (1972)
Cantos de España, Op. 232, No. 4: Córdoba (Nocturne).  Music of Spain, Vol. 5 (1983)/ ¡Guitarra! The Guitar in Spain (1985)


*The obvious reason for recording this gem twice was because initially he played it as a duet for two guitars with John Williams and the second time it was recorded as a solo piece. The same recording found on Music of Spain, vol. 5 is the same recording that was included later in the Spanish music retrospective ¡Guitarra! The Guitar in Spain and also used for the film series ¡Guitarra! A Musical Journey Through Spain.



Suite Española, Op. 47, No. 1 - Granada. Popular Classics for Spanish Guitar (1964)
Suite Española, Op. 47, No. 1 - Granada. Music of Spain, vol. 5 - Plays Granados and Albéniz (1983)


*This piece was initially recorded early on for Popular Classics for Spanish Guitar, released in 1964. The album was a mix of different pieces by composer commonly played on a classical guitar and only included two pieces by Albéniz. For the  Music of Spain, vol. 5 - Plays Granados and Albéniz, released nearly 20 years later, he wanted to play most of the pieces commonly associated with the "Suite Española". If you exclude "Asturia (Leyenda)" (that was actually not originally meant to be part of the suite), "Granada" and "Sevilla" are the two most popular and commonly played movements from the "Suite Española". This recorded version of "Granada" from 1983 was also used in the film series ¡Guitarra! A Musical Journey Through Spain.



Suite Española, Op. 47, No. 4 - Cádiz.   Music of Spain, vol. 5 - Plays Granados and Albéniz (1983)/ ¡Guitarra! The Guitar in Spain (1985) 
Suite Española, Op. 47, No. 4 - Cádiz (rehearsal in car - film series only).   ¡Guitarra! A Musical Journey Through Spain (1985)


* This piece was recorded initially for Music of Spain, vol. 5 - Plays Granados and Albéniz. This is the same recording that was included later in the Spanish music retrospective ¡Guitarra! The Guitar in Spain and also used for the film series ¡Guitarra! A Musical Journey Through Spain. The piece was also filmed live on location in Cádiz, Spain while he was rehearsing in a car and the footage was also used in the film series. It is one of two pieces that appears twice in the aforementioned film.




Richard Alison:

De La Tromba Pavin.   An Evening of Elizabethan Music (1963) - The Julian Bream Consort
De La Tromba Pavin.   Fantasies, Ayres and Dances (1988) - The Julian Bream Consort

The Batchelars Delight.   An Evening of Elizabethan Music (1963) - The Julian Bream Consort
The Batchelars Delight.   Fantasies, Ayres and Dances (1988) - The Julian Bream Consort


*The Julian Bream Consort recorded both of these pieces by Alison twice. First with the early incarnation of the consort in 1963 and then the second recording in  1988 with the new incarnation of the consort. Bream had not recorded with the consort in over 20 years and many of the original performers where no longer performing or had passed.




Malcolm Arnold:

Guitar Concerto, Op.67, No.  1 - Allegro, 2 - Lento , Vivace, Lento, 3 - Con brio.   Guitar Concertos (1961)
Guitar Concerto, Op.67, No.  1 - Allegro, 2 - Lento , Vivace, Lento, 3 - Con brio.   To the Edge of Dream (1993)


* The "Guitar Concerto, Op.67" was a concerto that Malcolm Arnold wrote specifically for Julian Bream. He recorded it in its entirety twice. In 1993, over 30 years later, Bream decides to re-record this concerto towards the end of his recording career.




Johann Sebastian Bach:

BWV 996

A Bach Recital for the Guitar (1957)

Lute Suite No.1 in E Minor, BWV 996 - IV Sarabande 
Lute Suite No.1 in E Minor, BWV 996 - V Bourrée


J.S. Bach Suites, Nos. 1 and 2 (1965)

Lute Suite No.1 in E Minor, BWV 996 - I  Praeludium  

Lute Suite No.1 in E Minor, BWV 996 - II Allemande

Lute Suite No.1 in E Minor, BWV 996 - III Courante

Lute Suite No.1 in E Minor, BWV 996 - IV Sarabande 

Lute Suite No.1 in E Minor, BWV 996 - V Bourrée  
Lute Suite No.1 in E Minor, BWV 996 - VI Gigue   


J.S Bach (1994)

Lute Suite No.1 in E Minor, BWV 996 - I  Praeludium 
Lute Suite No.1 in E Minor, BWV 996 - II Allemande
Lute Suite No.1 in E Minor, BWV 996 - III Courante
Lute Suite No.1 in E Minor, BWV 996 - IV Sarabande
Lute Suite No.1 in E Minor, BWV 996 - V Bourrée  
Lute Suite No.1 in E Minor, BWV 996 - VI Gigue 


BWV 997
A Bach Recital for the Guitar (1957)

Lute Suite No. 2 in C Minor, BWV 997 - I Praeludium (Prelude)

Lute Suite No. 2 in C Minor, BWV 997 - II Fuga (Fugue) 


J.S. Bach Suites, Nos. 1 and 2 (1965)
Lute Suite No. 2 in C Minor, BWV 997 - I Praeludium 
Lute Suite No. 2 in C Minor, BWV 997 - II Fuga  


BWV 998

A Bach Recital for the Guitar (1957)
Prelude, Fugue and Allegro In E flat major, BWV 998 - 1. Prelude

Prelude, Fugue and Allegro In E flat major, BWV 998 - 2. Fugue-attacca

Prelude, Fugue and Allegro In E flat major, BWV 998 - 3. Allegro


J.S Bach (1994)

Prelude, Fugue and Allegro In E flat major, BWV 998 - 1. Prelude
Prelude, Fugue and Allegro In E flat major, BWV 998 - 2. Fugue-attacca
Prelude, Fugue and Allegro In E flat major, BWV 998 - 3. Allegro


BWV 999

A Bach Recital for the Guitar (1957) 
Prelude in C minor, BWV 999 (played in D minor)


Baroque Guitar (1966) 
Prelude in C minor, BWV 999 (played in D minor)   


BWV 1004

A Bach Recital for the Guitar (1957) 
Violin Partita, Solo No. 2 in D Minor, BWV 1004 - Chaconne 


Guitar Recital: Bach, Sor, Turina, Tippett, Schubert (Testament) (1975, released  2005)
Violin Partita, Solo No. 2 in D Minor, BWV 1004 - Chaconne 


J.S Bach (1994)  
Violin Partita, Solo No. 2 in D Minor, BWV 1004 - Chaconne  


*Early on in Bream's recording career he recorded a Bach album that was focused more on the more recognizable movements of different suites.  It was on this 1957 album, A Bach Recital for the Guitar, that he first recorded two movements from the "Lute Suite No.1 in E Minor" (BWV 996) and two movements from the "Lute Suite No. 2 in C Minor" (BWV 997) along with a few other choice suite movements. He did include BWV 998 in its entirety and opened the album with the "Chaconne" (BWV 1004) followed by the "Prelude in C minor" (BWV 999) on that early recording. Eight years later, he decided to record a proper Bach album by presenting the complete suites in the manner that they were originally intended. From that time onward, Julian Bream stuck to that method of presenting complete suites on his albums whenever possible.  He recorded the entire suite BWV 996 in 1965 and then again towards the end of his recording career in 1994 - J.S. Bach Suites, Nos. 1 and 2 and J.S Bach respectively. In this later recording he also revisited the complete "Prelude, Fugue and Allegro In E flat major", BWV 999 and the "Chaconne" (BWV 1004) as the solo center piece to the album.


*It is interesting to note that there are three available recordings on audio of Julian Bream playing the Bach "Chaconne". Two of the recordings were released on albums nearly 40 years apart with the knowledge that they would remain for prosperity.  When he played the piece in 1975 for the BBC radio, he likely thought that the only people that would ever hear it were the ones that happened to be listening to the radio on that particular day. When the BBC decided to release a CD of Bream radio studio recordings from the vault, it provided us with a unique experience. To hear these three interpretations, roughly 18 years apart, of such an important, beautiful and difficult piece in the guitar repretoire is a rare experience. It provides an opportunity for the listeners to experience the growth and interpretation capabilities of the maestro throughout his lengthy career.




Luigi Boccherini:

Guitar Quintet, G. 448 - Introduction & Fandango  (based on Guitar Quintet, G. 448).    Julian Bream and His Friends (1968)
​Guitar Quintet, G. 448 - Fandango.   ¡Guitarra! The Guitar in Spain (1985)


* The "Introducion & Fandango" was initially recorded by Julian Bream along with George Malcolm on harpsichord. The "Fandango" was again recorded by Bream for the ¡Guitarra! The Guitar in Spain. Julian Bream played both parts on classical guitar and the two parts were later overdubbed. This recording was also used for the film series  ¡Guitarra! A Musical Journey Through Spain where "two" Julian Breams appeared on screen playing a duet. 



Benjamin Britten

20th Century Guitar (1967)

Nocturnal after John Dowland, Op. 70 (1963)  


Nocturnal (1993)

Nocturnal - 1. Musingly (Meditativo)   EMI
Nocturnal - 2. Agitated (Molto Agitativo)
Nocturnal - 3. Restless (Inquieto)
Nocturnal - 4. Uneasy (Ansioso)
Nocturnal - 5. March-Like (Quasi Una Marcia)
Nocturnal - 6. Dreaming (Sognanti)
Nocturnal - 7. Gently Rocking (Culiante)
Nocturnal - 8. Passacaglia (Misurato)
Nocturnal - 9. Slow & Quiet (Molto Tranquillo)


* "Nocturnal after John Dowland" was a suite that Britten wrote specifically for Julian Bream. He recorded it in its entirety twice. Initially it was presented on the album jacket as a long continuous piece under one title. Nearly 30 years later in 1993, he decides to re-record this difficult suite towards the end of his recording career. At that time he presented the suite on the album jacket as separate movements.




William Byrd:

Pavin.               An Evening of Elizabethan Music (1963) - The Julian Bream Consort (Bream lute solo)                  
Pavana Bray.   Julian Bream in Concert (1965) - Julian Bream on lute




Manuel de Falla:

Homenaje pour le Tombeau de Claude Debussy.   Spanish Guitar Music: Turina, de Falla, Sor (1956)
Homenaje pour le Tombeau de Claude Debussy.   Popular Classics for Spanish Guitar (1964)
Homenaje pour le Tombeau de Claude Debussy.   Music of Spain, vol. 7-A Celebration of Andrés Segovia (1984)/¡Guitarra! The Guitar in Spain (1985)


*This piece is considered to be one of the most beautiful and important compositions for classical guitar by a Spanish composer. It is only natural that Bream would consider recording it a few times throughout his lengthy career whenever it appeared indicated. Initially he recorded the piece as a young man when he was on the Westminster label on an album titled Spanish Guitar Music: Turina, de Falla, Sor. When he moved from that small label to the large, international label, RCA Victor Red Seal, it would not be long before he would find himself wanting to record another Spanish album of Spanish classics. Popular Classics for Spanish Guitar became a very popular recording which increased the public exposure to this beautiful piece. Finally, when Bream's popular "Music of Spain" period came around nearly 20 years later, the piece was recorded again for Music of Spain, vol. 7-A Celebration of Andrés Segovia. The same recording found on Music of Spain, vol. 7-A Celebration of Andrés Segovia is the same recording that was included later in the Spanish music retrospective ¡Guitarra! The Guitar in Spain and for use in the film series ¡Guitarra! A Musical Journey Through Spain.




Luis de Milán: 

El Maestro-Fantasía XXII  (on Renaissance lute).   Music of Spain, vol. 1 - Plays Milán & Narváez (1979)
El Maestro-Fantasía XXII  (on Spanish vihuela),  called Fantasía XXIII in the film (mistake).   ¡Guitarra! The Guitar in Spain (1985)

El Maestro-Pavana VI  (on Renaissance lute).   Music of Spain, vol. 1 - Plays Milán & Narváez (1979)
El Maestro-Pavana VI  (on Spanish vihuela).   ¡Guitarra! A Musical Journey Through Spain.
 (1985)


* These two pieces by de Milán were initially recorded with a Renaissance lute on Music of Spain, vol. 1 - Plays Milán & Narváez. The lute was played in the rest of Europe during the Renaissance and Baroque periods but the instrument never appeared to have a significant presence in Spain. Mr. Bream decided that it would be significantly more appropriate if these early pieces were played and re-recorded on their intended instrument. When the opportunity arose during the recording and filming of the "¡Guitarra!" film series, Bream re-recorded these two piece on a Spanish vihuela for the LP release ¡Guitarra! The Guitar in Spain and for use in the film series ¡Guitarra! A Musical Journey Through Spain. The Pavan only appeared in the movie.



Luys de Narváez:

Los seys libros del delphín; Libro III, La Canción del Emperador  (on Renaissance lute).   Music of Spain, vol. 1 - Plays Milán & Narváez (1979)
Los seys libros del delphín; Libro III, La Canción del Emperador  (on Spanish vihuela).   ¡Guitarra! The Guitar in Spain (1985)


Los seys libros del delphín; Libro V, Ya Se Asiente el Rey Ramiro  (on Renaissance lute)   Music of Spain, vol. 1 - Plays Milán & Narváez (1979)

Los seys libros del delphín; Libro V, Ya Se Asiente el Rey Ramiro  (on Spanish vihuela)   ¡Guitarra! A Musical Journey Through Spain (1985)

Los seys libros del delphín; Libro VI, Conde Claros  (on Renaissance lute).   Music of Spain, vol. 1 - Plays Milán & Narváez (1979)
Los seys libros del delphín; Libro VI, Conde Claros  (on Spanish vihuela).   ¡Guitarra! The Guitar in Spain (1985)


* These three pieces by de Narváez were initially recorded with a Renaissance lute on Music of Spain, vol. 1 - Plays Milán & Narváez. The lute was played in the rest of Europe during the Renaissance and Baroque periods but the instrument never appeared to have a significant presence in Spain. Mr. Bream decided that it would be significantly more appropriate if these early pieces were played and re-recorded on their intended instrument. When the opportunity arose during the recording and filming of the "¡Guitarra!" film series, Bream re-recorded these three piece on a Spanish vihuela for the LP release ¡Guitarra! The Guitar in Spain and for use in the film series ¡Guitarra! A Musical Journey Through Spain. The "Ya Se Asiente el Rey Ramiro" recording on the Spanish vihuela did not appear on ¡Guitarra! The Guitar in Spain due to space limitations but the recording was included in the film ¡Guitarra! A Musical Journey Through Spain.




John Dowland:

Can She Excuse My Wrongs?                      An Evening of Elizabethan Music (1963) with The Julian Bream Consort                    
Can She Excuse My Wrongs?                      Elizabethan Lute Songs (1970) - Julian Bream on lute with tenor Peter Pears on vocals
Can She Excuse?                                            Fantasies, Ayres and Dances (1988) -  The Julian Bream Consort with tenor Robert Tear on vocals


Captain Digorie Piper's Galliard No. 19.   Julian Bream in Concert (1965) - Julian Bream on lute 
Captain Piper's Galliard.                              Lute Music of John Dowland (1976) - Julian Bream on lute


Fantasia.                                                          Julian Bream Plays Dowland  (1957) - Julian Bream on lute                                   
Fantasia.                                                          An Evening of Elizabethan Music (1963) - The Julian Bream Consort 

                         
Forlorne Hope Fancy.                                   Julian Bream Plays Dowland (1957) - Julian Bream on lute                
Forlorn Hope Fancy No. 6.                          Lute Music of John Dowland (1976) - Julian Bream on lute    

I saw my lady weep.                                      Elizabethan Lute Songs-An Anthology (1956) - Julian Bream on lute with tenor Peter Pears on vocals
I saw my lady weep.                                      Elizabethan Lute Songs (1970) - Julian Bream on lute with tenor Peter Pears on vocals
                                                                    
In darkness let me dwell.                            Elizabethan Lute Songs-An Anthology (1956) - Julian Bream on lute with tenor Peter Pears on vocals
In darkness let me dwell.                             Julian Bream in Concert (1965) - Julian Bream on lute with tenor Peter Pears on vocals  
           
Lachrimae Antiquae Pavan.                        Julian Bream Plays Dowland (1957) - Julian Bream on lute
Lachrimae antiquae.                                     Dances of Dowland (1968) - Julian Bream on lute
Lachrimae Pavin.                                           An Evening of Elizabethan Music (1963) - The Julian Bream Consort          
Lachrimae Pavin.                                           Fantasies, Ayres and Dances (1988) - The Julian Bream Consort
Lachrimae Pavin.                                           Two Loves (1989) - Julian Bream on lute   

Loth to Depart.                                              The Wood So Wild (1972) - Julian Bream on lute
Loth to Depart.                                              Two Loves (1989) - Julian Bream on lute
  
Melancholy Galliard.                                    Julian Bream Plays Dowland (1957) - Julian Bream on lute                     
Melancholy galliard.                                     Dances of Dowland (1968) - Julian Bream on lute
Melancholy Galliard.                                    Two Loves (1989) - Julian Bream on lute

Mignarda.                                                       The Golden Age of English Lute Music (1961) - Julian Bream on lute                                          
Mignarda.                                                       Two Loves (1989) - Julian Bream on lute

Mrs. Vaux's Gigge.                                        Julian Bream Plays Dowland (1957) - Julian Bream on lute
Mrs Vaux's gigge.                                          Dances of Dowland (1968) - Julian Bream on lute

My Ladye Hunsdon's Puffe.                        Julian Bream Plays Dowland (1957) - Julian Bream on lute          
My Lady Hunsdon's puffe.                          Dances of Dowland (1968) - Julian Bream on lute
My Lady Hunsdon's Puffe.                          Two Loves (1989) - Julian Bream on lute  
     
Orlando Sleepeth.                                         Julian Bream Plays Dowland (1957) - Julian Bream on lute              
Orlando sleepeth.                                         Two Loves (1989) - Julian Bream on lute

Queen Elizabeth's Galliard.                         Julian Bream Plays Dowland  (1957) - Julian Bream on lute 
Queen Elizabeth's Galliard.                         Julian Bream in Concert (1965) - Julian Bream on lute
Queen Elizabeth's Galliard.                          Lute Music from the Royal Courts of Europe (1967) - Julian Bream on lute
Queen Elizabeth's Galliard.                          Two Loves (1989) - Julian Bream on lute

Semper Dowland, Semper Dolens.             Julian Bream Plays Dowland (1957) - Julian Bream on lute
Semper Dowland, Semper Dolens.             Dances of Dowland (1968) - Julian Bream on lute   
Semper Dowland, semper dolens.             Two Loves (1989) - Julian Bream on lute      

Sorrow Stay.                                                    A Recital of Lute Songs (1960)  -  Julian Bream on lute with tenor Peter Pears on vocals                      
Sorrow, stay.                                                   Julian Bream in Concert (1965) - Julian Bream on lute with tenor Peter Pears on vocals  

Tarleton's Resurrection.                               An Evening of Elizabethan Music (1963) The Julian Bream Consort  (Bream lute solo)                    
Tarleton's Resurrection                                Julian Bream in Concert (1965) - Julian Bream on lute
Tarleton's Resurrection (1)                          Two Loves  (1989) - Julian Bream on lute          
Tarleton's Resurrection (2)                          Two Loves (1989) - Julian Bream on lute  

* Same piece but some more extended with repetitions than others.       

The Earl of Derby, his galliard.                   Dances of Dowland (1968) - Julian Bream on lute   
The Earl of Derby's Galliard.                       Two Loves (1989) - Julian Bream on lute         

The Frog Galliard.                                         An Evening of Elizabethan Music (1963) - The Julian Bream Consort                     
The frog galliard.                                           Dances of Dowland (1968) - Julian Bream on lute   
The Frog Galliard.                                         Fantasies, Ayres and Dances (1988) - The Julian Bream Consort


* Julian bream has recorded Elizabethan and Jacobian music extensively on solo lute and as a lute player within The Julian Bream Consort. He has also recorded many of these pieces with the Consort or a with just the lute while accompanying tenors such as Peter Pears and Robert Tear.



Thomas Ford:

Come Phylis, come.                                       A Recital Of Lute Songs (1960) - Julian Bream on lute with tenor Peter Pears on vocals
Come, Phyllis                                                 Elizabethan Lute Songs (1970) - Julian Bream on lute with tenor Peter Pears on vocals


Fair, sweet, cruel.                                          Elizabethan Lute Songs-An Anthology (1956) - Julian Bream on lute with tenor Peter Pears on vocals
Fair, Sweet, Cruel.                                        Elizabethan Lute Songs (1970) - Julian Bream on lute with tenor Peter Pears on vocals




Miguel Llobet:

Trad.-Canciones Populares Catalanas - El Testament d'Amelia.   Popular Classics for Spanish Guitar (1964)
Trad.-Canciones Populares Catalanas - El Testament d'Amelia.   La Guitarra Romantica: Llobet, Pujol, Tárrega (1991)


*This piece was initially recorded early on for Popular Classics for Spanish Guitar, released in 1964. The album was a mix of different pieces by composer commonly played on a classical guitar and only included one piece that was arranged by Miguell Llobet. Nearly two decades later the  "Music of Spain" period was a time when Julian Bream decided he would record as much Spanish music of all periods with the intent to released them in a chronological manner. He had several recordings left over when the Music of Spain period came to a close. He later decided to release some of these recording in 1991 and decided some additional music for the release. Bream recorded 9 out of the 13 popular Catalan folksongs arranged by Miguel Llobet.




Frank Martin:

 20th Century Guitar (1967)

Quatre pièces brèves pour guitare- 1. Prélude Lent: Vite   

Quatre pièces brèves pour guitare- 2. Air: Lent Et Bien Rhythmé  

Quatre pièces brèves pour guitare- 3. Plainte: Sans Lenteur 

Quatre pièces brèves pour guitare- 4. Comme Une Gigue: Con Moto 

Nocturnal (1993)

Quatre pièces brèves pour guitare- 1. Prélude Lent: Vite   
Quatre pièces brèves pour guitare- 2. Air: Lent Et Bien Rhythmé    
Quatre pièces brèves pour guitare- 3. Plainte: Sans Lenteur
Quatre pièces brèves pour guitare- 4. Comme Une Gigue: Con Moto


* Quatre pièces brèves pour guitare was a suite that Frank Martin composed for Andres Segovia but he never recorded the composition. Bream recorded it in its entirety twice. 




Federico Moreno Tórroba:
Sonatina in A major- 1. Alegretto - Guitar Music of Villa-Lobos and Tórroba (1956) 

Sonatina in A major- 1. Alegretto - ¡Guitarra! The Guitar in Spain (1985)
  


Thomas Morley:

It was a lover and his lass.    Elizabethan Lute Songs- An Anthology (1956) - Julian Bream on lute with tenor Peter Pears on vocals
It Was a Lover and His Lass.    Elizabethan Lute Songs (1970) - Julian Bream on lute with tenor Peter Pears on vocals


*Both times this piece was recorded with tenor Peter Pears on vocals and Bream on Lute.

Thyris and Mila.   A Recital Of Lute Songs (1960) - Julian Bream on lute with tenor Peter Pears on vocals
Thirsis & Milla.   Fantasies, Ayres and Dances (1988) - The Julian Bream Consort with tenor Robert Tear on vocals


*Initially performed with tenor Peter Pears on vocals and Bream on Lute. Nearly 30 years later Bream re-recorded it with the Julian Bream Consort with tenor Robert Tear on vocals. 




Alonso Mudarra:

Fantasía X (on lute).   Lute Music from the Royal Courts of Europe (196)
Fantasía X (on vihuela).   ¡Guitarra! The Guitar in Spain (1985)


* These piece by Mudarra was initially recorded with a Renaissance lute on Lute Music from the Royal Courts of Europe. The lute was played in the rest of Europe during the Renaissance and Baroque periods but the instrument never appeared to have a significant presence in Spain. Mr. Bream decided that it would be significantly more appropriate if these early pieces were played and re-recorded on their intended instrument. When the opportunity arose during the recording and filming of the "¡Guitarra!" film series, Bream re-recorded this piece on a Spanish vihuela for the LP release ¡Guitarra! The Guitar in Spain and for use in the film series ¡Guitarra! A Musical Journey Through Spain.




Peter Phillips:
Philips Pavin.     An Evening of Elizabethan Music (1963) - The Julian Bream Consort                     
Phillips Pavin.   Fantasies, Ayres and Dances (1988) - The Julian Bream Consort


*The Julian Bream Consort recorded this piece by Peter Philips twice. First with the early incarnation of the consort in 1963 and then the second recording in  1988 with the new incarnation of the consort. Bream had not recorded with the consort in over 20 years and many of the original performers where no longer performing or had passed.




Maurice Ravel:

Pavane pour une infante défunte (Pavane For A Dead Princess).   The Art of Julian Bream (1960)
Pavane pour une infante défunte (Pavane For A Dead Princess) (2 guitars).   Julian & John ("Together") (1972)


*Initially recorded as a solo piece and later arranged for two guitars.




Joaquín Rodrigo:

Rodrigo, Vivaldi, Britten (1964)- Melos Chamber Orchestra and conducted by Colin Davis 

Concierto de Aranjuez, No. 1  Allegro con spirito  

Concierto de Aranjuez, No. 2  Adagio    
Concierto de Aranjuez, No. 2  Allegro gentile    


Rodrigo and Berkeley  (1975) - Monteverdi Orchestra and conducted by John Eliot Gardiner

Concierto de Aranjuez, No. 1  Allegro con spirito
Concierto de Aranjuez, No. 2  Adagio    
Concierto de Aranjuez, No. 2  Allegro gentile  


Music of Spain, vol. 8-Joaquín Rodrigo: Last of the Spanish Romantics (1984) - Chamber Orchestra of Europe and conducted by John Eliot Gardiner

Concierto de Aranjuez, No. 1  Allegro con spirito  
Concierto de Aranjuez, No. 2  Adagio    
Concierto de Aranjuez, No. 2  Allegro gentile 


¡Guitarra! A Musical Journey Through Spain ( film series 1985) - Chamber Orchestra of Europe and conducted by Sir Charles Groves 

Concierto de Aranjuez, No. 1  Allegro con spirito  
Concierto de Aranjuez, No. 2  Adagio  (second movement also appeared on the companion LP ¡Guitarra! The Guitar in Spain). 
Concierto de Aranjuez, No. 2  Allegro gentile 


To the Edge of Dream: Rodrigo, Takemitsu, Arnold (1993) - City Of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra and conductor by Simon Rattle
Concierto de Aranjuez, No. 1  Allegro con spirito
Concierto de Aranjuez, No. 2  Adagio    
Concierto de Aranjuez, No. 2  Allegro gentile 


*Julian Bream recorded Joaquin Rodrigo's "Concierto de Aranjuez" FIVE times throughout his recording career. Four of those recordings appeared on record albums and one was recorded on film for the final segment of the film series ¡Guitarra! A Musical Journey Through Spain. Each time Julian Bream used a different combination of orchestra and conducter. H did use the  Chamber Orchestra of Europe and John Eliot Gardiner conductor twice but once together.



Philip Rosseter:
What then is love but mourning (2:53)   Elizabethan Lute Songs- An Anthology (1956)
What Then Is Love but Mourning?          Elizabethan Lute Songs

When Laura Smiles.   Elizabethan Lute Songs- An Anthology (1956) - Julian Bream on lute with tenor Peter Pears on vocals

When Laura Smiles.   Elizabethan Lute Songs (1970) - Julian Bream on lute with tenor Peter Pears on vocals

*Both times this piece was recorded with tenor Peter Pears on vocals and Bream on Lute.




Gaspar Sanz:

Canarios.   Baroque Guitar (1966) - Julian Bream played a standard classical guitar
Canarios.   ¡Guitarra! The Guitar in Spain (1985) - Julian Bream played a Baroque guitar


* The popular piece "Canarios" by Gaspar Sanz was initially recorded with a classical guitar on the album Baroque Guitar. When the opportunity arose during the recording and filming of the "¡Guitarra!" film series, Bream re-recorded this piece on a Baroque guitar for the LP release ¡Guitarra! The Guitar in Spain and the recording was used in the film series ¡Guitarra! A Musical Journey Through Spain.


Galliardas.   ¡Guitarra! The Guitar in Spain (1985) - (Julian Bream played a baroque guitar)

Galliardas.   ¡Guitarra! A Musical Journey Through Spain (1985) - (Julina Bream played a baroque guitar - rehearsal in train car - film series only)


*Julian Bream recorded "Galliardas" on a Baroque guitar for the LP release ¡Guitarra! The Guitar in Spain and the recording was used in the film series ¡Guitarra! A Musical Journey Through Spain. The film also shows footage of Julian Bream practicing this piece live on location while traveling in a train accross Spain. It is one of two pieces that appears twice in the aforementioned film - the other piece being "Cádiz" by Albéniz.



Fernando Sor:

Fantasia, Op 7- Largo.                      Spanish Guitar Music: Turina, de Falla, Sor (1956)
Fantasia, Op 7- Largo.                      Baroque Guitar (1966)
Fantasie, Op. 7; Largo non tanto.   Music of Spain, vol. 4-The Classical Heritage: Sor and Aguado (1981)


*The Fantasia, Op. 7-Largo was recorded three times but only one of the times did he also record two other movements in the Op. 7 for the album Music of Spain, vol. 4-The Classical Heritage: Sor and Aguado.


Grand Solo- Sonata in D, Op.14 - Introduction.                      Classic Guitar (1969)
Grand Solo- Sonata in D, Op.14 - Allegro.                                Classic Guitar (1969)
Grand Solo- Sonata in D, Op. 14- Introduccion y Allegro.    ¡Guitarra! The Guitar in Spain (1985)


*The Grand Solo was recorded twice. The first time was in 1969 when he was recording for an album of composers from the Classical period. The second time he recorded the piece was for inclusion in ¡Guitarra! The Guitar in Spain. That same recording was used for the film ¡Guitarra! A Musical Journey Through Spain.


Music of Spain, vol. 4-The Classical Heritage: Sor and Aguado (1981)

Introduccion y Variaciones en un Tema de Mozart, Op.9, 01-Introduccion: Andante largo

Introduccion y Variaciones en un Tema de Mozart, Op.9, 02-Theme: Andante moderato

Introduccion y Variaciones en un Tema de Mozart, Op.9, 03-Variations 1 to 5


¡Guitarra! The Guitar in Spain (1985)     also film

Introduccion y Variaciones en un Tema de Mozart, Op.9, 01-Introduccion: Andante largo
Introduccion y Variaciones en un Tema de Mozart, Op.9, 02-Theme: Andante moderato
Introduccion y Variaciones en un Tema de Mozart, Op.9, 03-Variations 1 to 5

Guitar Recital: Bach, Sor, Turina, Tippett, Schubert (Testament) (released 2005)

Introduction and Variations On Mozart's 'O cara armonia' Op.9 (recorded 1982)


*Julian Bream recorded the "Introduccion y Variaciones en un Tema de Mozart, Op.9" twice for prosperity within a very short period of time. The second time he recorded the piece was for inclusion in ¡Guitarra! The Guitar in Spain. That same recording was used for the film ¡Guitarra! A Musical Journey Through Spain.

Shortly after the initial recording in 1981, Bream played it for the BBC radio in 1982. That radio studio recording surfaced in 2005 when the BBC released a CD of recordings by Julian Bream.




Francisco Tárrega:

Three Mazurkas: Mazurka in G major - Romantic Guitar (1970) 
Three Mazurkas: Mazurka in G major - La Guitarra Romantica (1991)   

Three Mazurkas: ¡Marieta! - Mazurka in A minor - Romantic Guitar (1970)      
Three Mazurkas: ¡Marieta! - Mazurka in A minor - ¡Guitarra!(film only) (1985) /La Guitarra Romantica (1991)




  

Joaquín Turina:
Spanish Guitar Music: Turina, de Falla, Sor (1956)

Homenaje a Tárrega, Op. 69 - I. Garrotín     
Homenaje a Tárrega, Op. 69 - II. Soleares


Popular Classics for Spanish Guitar (1964)       

Homenaje a Tárrega, Op. 69 - I. Garrotín  
Homenaje a Tárrega, Op. 69 - II. Soleares  

Fandanguillo, Op. 36.   Spanish Guitar Music: Turina, de Falla, Sor (1956)
Fandanguillo, Op. 36.   Popular Classics for Spanish Guitar (1964)
Fandanguillo, Op. 36.   Music of Spain, vol. 7-A Celebration of Andrés Segovia (1984)/¡Guitarra! The Guitar in Spain (1985)


* Both "Garrotín and Soleares" from "Homenaje a Tárrega", along with the "Fandanguillo" were recorded twice early on in Bream's recording career. The "Fandanguillo" was recorded a third time during the "Music of Spain" period for Music of Spain, vol. 7-A Celebration of Andrés Segovia album. The same recording appeared on ¡Guitarra! The Guitar in Spain and the was also used in the film series ¡Guitarra! A Musical Journey Through Spain. 




Heitor Villa-Lobos:

12 Etudes for Guitar - No. 5 - Andantino.   20th Century Guitar (1967)
12 Etudes for Guitar - No. 5 - Andantino.   Villa-Lobos: 12 Etudes for Guitar and Suite Populaire Brésilienne (1978)


12 Etudes for Guitar - No. 7 -  Très animé;   20th Century Guitar (1967)
12 Etudes for Guitar - No. 7 -  Très animé;   Villa-Lobos: 12 Etudes for Guitar and Suite Populaire Brésilienne (1978)

12 Etudes for Guitar - No. 8 - Moderato.   Julian bream plays Villa-Lobos (1971)
12 Etudes for Guitar - No. 8 -  Moderato.   Villa-Lobos: 12 Etudes for Guitar and Suite Populaire Brésilienne (1978)


12 Etudes for Guitar - No. 11 - Lent; Animé.   Popular Classics for Spanish Guitar (1964)
12 Etudes for Guitar - No. 11 - Lent; Animé.   Villa-Lobos: 12 Etudes for Guitar and Suite Populaire Brésilienne (1978)


* The 12 Etudes for Guitar were composed by Villa-Lobos for Andres Segovia and would become important study and performance compositions in the guitar repertoire. Bream recorded several etudes and included them as solo compositions on several of his record albums throughout the first half of his recording career. In 1978 he decided to record all 12 Etudes along with the Suite Populaire Brésilienne for his Villa-Lobos: 12 Etudes for Guitar and Suite Populaire Brésilienne album. This would become the second album dedicated exclusively to the compositions of Heitor Villa-Lobos. 


Guitar Music of Villa-Lobos and Tórroba

Five Preludes for Guitar- No. 1 In E minor   

Five Preludes for Guitar- No. 2 In E major

Five Preludes for Guitar- No. 3 In A minor

Five Preludes for Guitar- No. 4 In E minor

Five Preludes for Guitar- No. 5 In D major 


Popular Classics for Spanish Guitar

Five Preludes for Guitar- No. 1 In E minor   Popular Classics for Spanish Guitar



Julian Bream plays Villa-Lobos (1971)

Five Preludes for Guitar- No. 1 In E minor     
Five Preludes for Guitar- No. 2 In E major     

Five Preludes for Guitar- No. 3 In A minor  
 
Five Preludes for Guitar- No. 4 In E minor    

Five Preludes for Guitar- No. 5 In D major 


* The Five preludes for Guitar was a suite of preludes that Villa-Lobos composed and would become important compositions in the guitar repertoire. Bream recorded the group of preludes in its entirety twice. The first time he recorded them was early on his career when he was with the small label Westminster. The second time was around 15 years later for the RCA label. In between that period of time, the "Prelude No. 1 In E minor from Five Preludes for Guitar" was recorded for Popular Classics for Spanish Guitar, released in 1964. The album was a mix of different pieces by composers commonly played on a classical guitar and it only included one prelude by Villa-Lobos along with one etude and one choro.

    


Suite Populaire Brésilienne, Schottische Choro.   Julian Bream plays Villa-Lobos (1971)
Suite Populaire Brésilienne, Schottische Choro.   Villa-Lobos: 12 Etudes for Guitar and Suite Populaire Brésilienne (1978)


* The "Schottische Choro" was initially recorded as a solo selection from the Suite Populaire Brésilienne to be  included on Julian Bream plays Villa-Lobos.  Seven years later Bream decided to record another album dedicated to Villa-Lobos in which the entire "Suite Populaire Brésilienne" was included therefore the "Schottische Choro" was recorded a second time.   




Antonio Vivaldi:

Rodrigo, Vivaldi, Britten (1963)

Concerto in D major for Lute and Strings, RV 93: No. 1 Allegro   
Concerto in D major for Lute and Strings, RV 93: No. 2 Largo   
Concerto in D major for Lute and Strings, RV 93: No. 3 Allegro      


Concerto for Lute and Orchestra (1975)

Concerto in D major for Lute and Strings, RV 93: No. 1 Allegro   
Concerto in D major for Lute and Strings, RV 93: No. 2 Largo   
Concerto in D major for Lute and Strings, RV 93: No. 3 Allegro 


*The Vivaldi concerto was initially recorded with the Melos Chamber Orchestra with Colin Davis conducting.  The concerto was re-recorded over 10 years later with the Monteverdi Orchestra with John Elliot Gardiner conducting.    




William Walton:

Julian Bream '70s (1973)

Five Bagatelles for Guitar - 1. Allegro   
Five Bagatelles for Guitar - 2. Lento; Tempo di valse  
Five Bagatelles for Guitar - 3. Alla cubana   
Five Bagatelles for Guitar - 4. Sempre espressivo 
Five Bagatelles for Guitar - 5. Con slancio  


Dedication (1984)
Five Bagatelles for Guitar - 1. Allegro   
Five Bagatelles for Guitar - 2. Lento; Tempo di valse  
Five Bagatelles for Guitar - 3. Alla cubana   
Five Bagatelles for Guitar - 4. Sempre espressivo 
Five Bagatelles for Guitar - 5. Con slancio  


* Five Bagatelles for Guitar was a suite that William Walton wrote for Julian Bream. He recorded it in its entirety twice. 

This page is dedicated to all the works that Julian Bream recorded more than once. There are many pieces that Bream recorded two and three times throughout his lengthy recording career. Initially, a lot of his second recordings were mainly due to initially being signed to the small label Westminster. Once he had signed with a giant label such as RCA, he recorded many pieces again knowing that the RCA albums would have better distribution and increased exposure. Later on, he would create concept albums that were comprised of either full suites, concertos or groups of compositions by a certain composer. He might have already recorded a portion of the suite or concerto but he would record them again within the context of the whole suite, concerto or groups of compositions typically associated with each other. 


When it came to Elizabthan music, many re-recordings had more to do with different arrangements and the people involved. Several were recorded with solo lute and then later with the Julian Bream Consort or with a lute and tenor. "Lachrimae pavin" was recorded numerous times either as a solo lute piece or with the whole consort. "Can She Exuse My Wrongs?" is a piece that was recorded once with lute and tenor Peter Pears on vocals. It was also recorded as an instrumental with The Julian Bream Consort and then later on the consort recorded it again with the addition of tenor Robert Tear.


Finally, there were the composition that he liked so much and felt challenged by them, that he felt he needed to revisit them whenever the opportunity presented itself. He officially recorded and released Joaquin Rodrigo's Concierto de Aranjuez FIVE times. Four times on vinyl and one time on film. Each time using a different combination of orchestra and conductor.

Revisited works

JulianBreamGuitar.com